Index of Incidental Mentions in The 252!

INDEX  OF  INCIDENTAL  MENTIONS  IN  THE  252!

A & M Records……………………………….64
ABC Records…………………………………151
Abbey Road…………………………………...43
abortion clinic………………………………236
Adele…………………………………………230, 200, 31
adult contemporary………………………239, 220, 205, 134, 120, 107, 91, 38, 33
Aerosmith…………………………………….224, 143
Aguilera, Christina……………………………31
Air Force Academy…………………………..110
air pollution………………………………….241
Akron…………………………………………240
Album of the Year………………………….138
aliens…………………………………………208
All Things Must Pass………………………179
alternative rock(ers)………………………233, 165, 53, 41, 24
“Always on My Mind”……………………….162
AM airplay…………………………………….186
America………………………………………..229
American………………………………………133, 100
American Bandstand………………………..156
American Gigolo…………………………….176

American Idol………………………………..205, 157, 116
American Werewolf in London, An………..7
AM radio (stations)…………………………248, 229

Andes, Mark…………………………………..197, 65
Aniston, Jennifer……………………………..70
Anka, Paul…………………………………….204
anti-materialistic…………………………….21
Antonoff, Jack……………………………….126
Apollonia………………………………………57
Armstrong, Dido……………………………184
arrangements……………………………….159
astrologer…………………………………….134
Australia(n)…………………………………..228, 221, 151, 115, 106, 40, 29, 10
Austria…………………………………………115
autobiographical……………………………190, 118, 110, 49
automobile accident……………………….110
Axton, Hoyt……………………………………227
Babys……………………………………………11
Bacharach, Burt……………………………….39
Bad English……………………………………..11
Baez, Joan……………………………………..178
barbiturates……………………………………127
barf bag………………………………………….117
barley fields……………………………………218
baseball…………………………………………..73
Basil, Toni………………………………………244
Bat out of Hell………………………………..129
BB gun………………………………………….152

Beatle(s)………………………………………..204, 88, 78, 74, 43, 27, 10
Becker, Walter……………………………….209
Beckford, Tyler……………………………….245
Bee Gees………………………………………..113
Belgium………………………………………….115
bell bottoms…………………………………..248
Benatar, Pat……………………………………231
Bennett, Tony…………………………………..39
“Bennie and the Jets”………………………..100
Bergen, Candice………………………………132
Berly, Kim……………………………………….19
Best Canadian Group of the Year…………..75
Best Contemporary Female Vocal Performance…..141

Best Country Song…………………………………………117
Best Female Country Vocal Performance…………….177, 135
Best Female Pop Vocal Performance…………………..184, 105, 88
Best Original Song…………………………………………. 191, 185
Best Pop Solo Performance………………………………..126
Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group……46
Beyoncé…………………………………………….31
Black, Karen……………………………………..121
Blackfoot…………………………………………..65
Blondie…………………………………………….212
Blossom Music Center………………………….173, 23
Bodyguard, The…………………………………..22
Boeing 707………………………………………..55
Bolan, Marc……………………………………..74
Bold and the Beautiful, The…………………77
Bonham, Jon…………………………………..211
Booker T. & the M.G.’s……………………….201
boonies…………………………………………241
Boston……………………………………………69
“Both Sides Now”…………………………….166
Bowie, David……………………………………143
Boyce, Tommy………………………………….142
Boyd, Pattie……………………………………..181
Brazilian………………………………………….103
“Break Through” ad campaign………………211
“Brian Wilson”…………………………………219
Britain, British…………………………………167, 151, 103, 99, 56, 10
British Invasion……………………………….217, 185, 27
Broadway musical……………………………..97
“Brother Louie”…………………………………32
Brothers Gibb……………………………………..9
Browne, Jackson………………………………141
bubblegum………………………………………140
bubble under…………………………………….19, 17
Buckingham, Lindsey…………………………34
Budweiser……………………………………….172
Buell, Bebe………………………………………143
Buffet, Jimmy…………………………………..186
Butler, Jerry………………………………………39
Byrds……………………………………………….201
Cadillac……………………………………………211
Cain, Jonathan………………………………….. 231
Calgary……………………………………………35, 19
California………………………………………..144, 106, 94
California, Randy………………………………65
Campbell, Glen…………………………………66, 39
Canada, Canadian………………………………219, 215, 198, 186, 175, 115, 91, 89, 66, 35, 19
Canadian Music and American Culture: Get Away from Me…..35
Canadian Music Hall of Fame………………49
cancer, pancreatic……………………………59
“Canned Heat Blues”………………………..87
Canton, Ohio…………………………………42
Carlton, Vanessa…………………………….203
Carmen, Eric……………………………………27
Carnes, Kim…………………………………..121
Carpenter, Karen…………………………..188, 64
Carpenter, Richard………………………..188
Carpenters……………………………………..64
Carrey, Jim…………………………………….245
Carroll, Gene…………………………………..94
Cars……………………………………………..59
Cash, Johnny…………………………………..66
cathartic exercise……………………………242
Cats……………………………………………171
center field…………………………………….73
Charles, Ray…………………………………….1
Chase, Chevy………………………………..138
Cher…………………………………………….229
Chicago………………………………………..107, 75, 45
Chicago, Illinois……………………………..45
Chicory, Chicory Tip………………………131
Chiffons………………………………………94
China…………………………………………186
Chippewa Lake Park……………………….45
Christianity…………………………………..170
Christmas…………………………………….205, 166, 16
Cincinnati, Ohio……………………………245
City by the Bay, The………………………154
city life………………………………………241
City That Never Sleeps, The…………….237
Clapton, Eric………………………………..176, 105, 66
Clark, Dick……………………………………156
classic rock…………………………………..108
Clemons, Clarence………………………….26
Cleveland Cavaliers………………………..25
Cleveland, Ohio……………………………..94, 27
clinical therapy………………………………94
Cobain, Kurt…………………………………150
Cobo Hall………………………………………63
Cocker, Joe…………………………………..249, 78
Cohen, Leonard……………………………..66
Cole, Jude…………………………………….174
Collins, Phil……………………………………71
compilation albums………………………..118
concrete shoes…………………………….228
contemporary Christian………………….233
contracts…………………………………….228
Cooper, Alice…………………………………65
Corgan, Billy………………………………….41
Counting Crows……………………………203
country (artist, chart, group,music)……223, 190, 177, 168, 164, 135, 91, 85, 61, 51, 38, 3
cowbell………………………………………..183
Crawford, Cindy……………………………245
Creedence Clearwater Revival…………..73
Crew Cuts……………………………………..67
Cronin, Kevin………………………………….6
Crosby, Bing…………………………………204
crossbreed sheep……………………………106
crossover……………………………………..91, 85, 51
“Cruel to Be Kind”………………………….12
CSNY…………………………………………240
Cummings, Burton…………………………49
Currie, Justin…………………………………53
Cuyahoga Falls………………………………73
cyanide……………………………………….228
dance music………………………………..119
Dark Side of the Moon……………………..43
David, Hal…………………………………….39

Davies, Rick………………………………….18
debauchery…………………………………123
Derek and the Dominoes…………………181
Detroit……………………………………….63
Detroit Red Wings………………………..219
DiCaprio, Leonardo………………………245
dilemma…………………………………….44
Dion, Celine…………………………………105, 91
disco…………………………………………222, 9, 7
Division Bell, The………………………….199
Dolenz, Mickey……………………………..142
domestic altercation…………………….152
Domino, Fats……………………………….78
Donald Trump Towers……………………101
doo-wop………………………………………68, 62, 18
Drewery, Corrine……………………………33
drip-dry………………………………………..144
drug overdose………………………………..42
Duran Duran…………………………………243, 212, 98
Duritz, Adam…………………………………191
Dylan, Bob…………………………………….203, 179, 130, 105, 66, 55
Dylan, Jakob………………………………….105
Eagles…………………………………………..209, 152, 141, 120, 54, 44
“Early Morning Rain”………………………..66
Earth, Wind & Fire…………………………..71
East Room……………………………………..201
Easy Listening………………………………..220
eBay……………………………………………..140
eclectic…………………………………………164
Eddie and the Cruisers………………………..5
Edge, The………………………………………..28
eerie stuff……………………………………..237
Eiffel Tower……………………………………101
8-track tapes………………………………….248
Electric Light Orchestra………………………69
Ellington, Duke………………………………..81
Elvis…………………………………………….204, 193, 78
Emerson, Keith………………………………124
EMI……………………………………………..240
England, English, Englishman……………..167, 112, 99, 80, 24, 14, 10, 1
E Street Band………………………………….26, 5
Ethiopia………………………………………..16
ET-like heart lights…………………………..24
Europe…………………………………………10
“Eve of Destruction”………………………121
“Everyday with Jesus”…………………….155
extraterrestrials…………………………….208
Faces…………………………………………..187
Fagen, Donald………………………………..209
Faith, Percy……………………………………203
falsetto…………………………………………..18
fantabulous…………………………………….25, 7
Fargo, Donna…………………………………….3
fatal accident…………………………………109
Ferguson, Jay………………………………….197
Fifth Dimension……………………………..249
financial straits……………………………….13
Firefall…………………………………………..65
Flack, Roberta………………………………..188
Fleetwood Mac……………………………….190
FM  (the movie)………………………………209
Fogerty, John…………………………………..37
folk music………………………………………121
folk rock………………………………………….99
Ford Pinto………………………………………248
Forrest Gump………………………………….81
Foster the People……………………………198
Four Seasons…………………………………..42, 39
France, French……………………………….128, 32
Francis, Connie………………………………..39
Franklin, Aretha………………………………86
freakish elbow……………………………….182
“Freebird”……………………………………….50
Frey, Glenn…………………………………….196, 141
Friday…………………………………………….216
fuck (up)………………………………………….99
fun.    …………………………………………..126
Gates, David…………………………………..173
Gaye, Marvin……………………………………52
General Hospital………………………………77
Genesis…………………………………………..158
Genesis 7:12……………………………………233
genre……………………………………………..146
geographical location………………………….24
German(y)………………………………………213, 176, 115, 32
Gibb, Maurice…………………………………113
Gibson Firebird………………………………..74
Gilmour, David……………………………….199
glam metal, glam rock………………………115, 10
God……………………………………………….233, 165
God bless you………………………………….26
Goffin, Gerry………………………………….238
Golden Globe…………………………………121
Good Morning, Vietnam…………………….151
Google…………………………………………..201, 15
gospel……………………………………………222
Graceland……………………………………..138
Grammy(s) (Award)……………………….246, 238, 184, 177, 162, 141, 138, 135, 134, 133, 128,  ………………………………………………126,117, 112, 105, 99, 91, 88, 48, 46, 41, 31
Grand Funk Railroad……………………..249
Grant, Amy…………………………………..203
Grass Roots……………………………………30
Grateful Dead………………………………..55
Great Britain………………………………..230
great flood…………………………………..233
Grossman, Ronnie………………………….94
guardian angels……………………………..62
Hagar, Sammy………………………………208
Hall & Oates…………………………………103, 69
Hall, Daryl……………………………………148
Hall of Fame  (baseball)…………………….73
Hammond organ………………………………95
Hanson………………………………………….28
Hard Day’s Night, A…………………………..93
hard drugs……………………………………..27
harmonica……………………………………214, 149, 104
Harrison, George…………………………….181, 179, 93, 88
Hart, Bobby………………………………….142
Hawaii(an)……………………………………203, 64
Hawking, Stephen…………………………199
Hawkins, Screamin’ Jay……………………..37
Hawn, Goldie………………………………..132
Hayes, Isaac………………………………….249
Hayward, Justin………………………………80
health care…………………………………….28
hearing loss………………………………….247
Heart…………………………………………..65
Heartburn……………………………………77
“Heart of Gold”……………………………..229

heavy metal………………………………….146
Hendrix, Jimi…………………………………165
Henley, Don………………………………….209, 141
heroin addiction…………………………….31
“Hey Jealousy”……………………………….13
high voltage…………………………………228
Hi Infidelity…………………………………….6
Hill, Andrea……………………………………94

Hill, Warren………………………………….120
hip-hop………………………………………..202, 115, 25
hit man………………………………………..228
Holland………………………………………..115
Hollies…………………………………………..78
Hollywood RockWalk……………………….213
honeymoon……………………………………60
Honeysuckle Rose…………………………..117
Hope, Bob…………………………………….94
Hopkins, Doug……………………………….13
“Horizontal Bop, The”………………………226
horn(s)…………………………………………164, 95, 75,71, 45
“Horse with No Name, A”…………………229
Hot Chocolate………………………………215
“How Can You Mend a Broken Heart”……..9
Hudson, Bill………………………………….132
Hudson, Kate………………………………..132
Hudson, Mark……………………………….132
Hudson, Oliver………………………………132
Hynde, Chrissy………………………………240
“I Am the Walrus”…………………………..74
“I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do)”………103
Idol, Billy……………………………………..224
“If You Leave”………………………………..14
“I Got a Line on You”……………………….197
Illinois………………………………………….228
Immortals:  The 100 Greatest Artists of All Time……..10
incinerates……………………………………102
Indianapolis……………………………………49
Innocent Man, An…………………………..149
intercourse…………………………………….139
International Geophysical Year…………….162
Internet…………………………………………216
Ireland, Irish………………………………….133, 115, 90
Ironworks Music……………………………….8
I Want to Take You Higher:  The Psychedelic Era 1965-1969……..243
Italy……………………………………………..115, 42
“It’s Been a Long Time”……………………..211
“I Want Candy”……………………………….106
Jackson Five……………………………………249, 243
Jackson, Janet…………………………………128
Jacksonville, Florida………………………….155
Jagger, Mick……………………………………143, 46, 31
James, LeBron………………………………….25
Japanese………………………………………….95
Jardine, Al………………………………………..23
jazz…………………………………………………104, 81, 31, 7
jealous(y)…………………………………………70, 21
Jefferson Airplane………………………………36
“Jingle Bells”…………………………………..166
John, Elton………………………………………100, 92
John, Robert……………………………………229
joie de vivre…………………………………….149
Jones, Booker T.   …………………………….201
Jones, Davy……………………………………..142
Jones, John Paul……………………………….251, 211
Jonze, Spike………………………………………15
Joplin, Janis………………………………………31
Journey……………………………………………231
“Joy to the World”……………………………..227
Juno Awards……………………………………..91
Kellogg’s…………………………………………156
Kendricks, Eddie……………………………….149
Kenny G………………………………………….120
Kent State………………………………………..94
King, Stephen…………………………………..53
Kiss………………………………………………..224
kiss of death…………………………………….32
Klawon, Dann…………………………………..27
Knight, Gladys, & The Pips…………………249, 188
Kravitz, Lenny………………………………….25
Krieger, Robbie………………………………..81
Kroeger, Chad………………………………..168
“Lady Liberty”………………………………… 23
Laing, Corky…………………………………..183
Lake, Greg……………………………………..124
Landers, Ann………………………………….226
lang, k.d.       ……………………………………91
Lange, “Mutt”………………………………….177
“Last Song”……………………………………..89
Las Vegas………………………………………..64
Latin…………………………………………….76
Laverne and Shirley………………………..132
La Voie, Roland Kent………………………192

Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs…..181
Led Zeppelin………………………………….251, 143
Legally Blond…………………………………231
Lennon, John………………………………….163, 93, 74

Let It Be………………………………………….43
Levine, Adam…………………………………207
Lewis, Jerry Lee……………………………..201
LGBT…………………………………………..126
Life for Real…………………………………..184
Lifehouse………………………………………..8
lifetime partner…………………………….111
Lightfoot, Gordon……………………………55
Limbaugh, Rush……………………………..240
Limp Biscuit…………………………………..212
linguist………………………………………….99
“Lion Sleeps Tonight, The”………………..229
“Little Bit O’ Soul……………………………141
“Little Lady”……………………………………23
Little League…………………………………..73
Little Night Music, A………………………..250
Little Richard………………………………….78
Lodge, John…………………………………….80
Loggins & Messina…………………………….54
London…………………………………………176
Loree, Anne……………………………………35
Los Angeles…………………………………..252, 216
Love, Courtney……………………………….28
“Love Is the Drug”…………………………..10
love triangle………………………………….246, 44
Lowe, Nick…………………………………….12
lunch counter………………………………….40
Lyme disease…………………………………114

Lynne, Jeff………………………………………74
Lynyrd Skynyrd……………………………….50
MacGraw, Ali…………………………………132
Madonna………………………………………212
“Maggie Mae”………………………………….187
Making It In The Business:  Overcoming Obstacles And Achieving Your Goals
……………………………………….In The Entertainment Industry………………………94
Maldonado, Marisol………………………..114
Manilow, Barry……………………………..189, 166
Manson, Marilyn…………………………….28
marketed, marketing……………………. 161, 123
Martha…………………………………………33
Martin, Curtis…………………………………38
Marvelows……………………………………..68
Mason, Dave…………………………………249
masturbation………………………………..246
Mathis, Johnny………………………………..66, 39
Mayan………………………………………….76
Mays, Willie…………………………………….73
McCartney, Paul………………………………93
McGuire, Barry………………………………121
McVie, Christine………………………………34
medieval……………………………………….124
Medina, Ohio…………………………………..45
Medlocke, Rickey…………………………….50
Meisner, Randy……………………………….54
Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness….41
Memphis Soul………………………………..201
Memphis, Tennessee………………………..224
Merriam-Webster……………………………99
Merv Griffin Show, The…………………….. 64
Messina, Jim…………………………………..54
metaphorical………………………………….99, 24
meth…………………………………………….63
Miami Heat…………………………………….25
Michael, George……………………………….16
Michigan………………………………………..63
“Mickey”……………………………………….244
Midler, Bette…………………………………200
Midwest………………………………………..26
Minnesota Fats……………………………….31
misogynistic………………………………….178
“Missing You”………………………………….11
Mitchell, Joni…………………………………166, 28
MLB……………………………………………..73
Monahan, Pat………………………………..242
Monkees, The Monkees…………………….132, 83
Monolopy©…………………………………….96
Monterey Pop Festival………………………144, 87
“Moonlight Feels Right”……………………..69
Moroder, Giorgio……………………………176
“Mother and Child Reunion”………………229
Motley Crue…………………………………..212
Motown…………………………………………221, 201, 149, 25
movie soundtrack……………………………22
Mr. Personality………………………………193
MTV…………………………………………….213, 102
Muehleisen, Maury…………………………..109
multi-ethnic…………………………………..104
Murray, Anne…………………………………..93
“Music Box Dancer”…………………………..214
music video……………………………………102
“My Heart Will Go On”………………………105
Nashville……………………………………….200
National Hockey League……………………101
NBA  2K14………………………………………..25
neckties…………………………………………228
Nelson, Willie…………………………………162
neophyte…………………………………………38
Nesmith, Michael…………………………….142
Netherlands…………………………………….71
Nevada………………………………………….251
“Never Been to Spain”………………………227
New Jersey…………………………………….101
New Year’s Eve………………………………238
New York(er)………………………………….238, 216, 110, 106
New Zealand………………………………….115
“Next to Me”………………………………….230
Nicks, Stevie……………………………………34
Nigeria………………………………………….167
Nilsson…………………………………………229
9-11………………………………………………237
9-1-1……………………………………………..152
Nine, The………………………………………208
Ninth Dimension…………………………….208
Nirvana………………………………………..150
Noah…………………………………………….233
North Carolina………………………………232
Northeast Ohio……………………………..131, 27
nourishment for your soul………………..2
novelty record………………………………129
November…………………………………….214
nuclear (bombs, holocaust, war)……….186, 139
Obama, President and Mrs.   ……………201
Ocasek, Ric…………………………………..150

Ocean, Billy………………………………….180
O’Donaghue, Danny………………………147
Ohio…………………………………………..106
“Ohio”………………………………………….240
Ol’ Blue Eyes…………………………………204
oldies…………………………………………..113
One-ders………………………………………185
O’Riordan, Dolores……………………………4
Oscar…………………………………………191, 185
out-of-body experiences………………….208
overpopulated and polluted………………96
Pacific Ocean…………………………………65
Page, Jimmy…………………………………211, 143
Page, Stephen………………………………219
Pappalardi, Felix…………………………..183
paramedic……………………………………247
parapsychology……………………………237
Parkinson’s………………………………….141
parody………………………………………189
Paul Revere & The Raiders……………….142
peeping toms……………………………….246
Perry, Steve………………………………….252
Peterik, Jim………………………………….122
Pfeiffer, Lori…………………………………..8
Pfeiffer, Michelle……………………………8
Ph.D.   ………………………………………..94
Philadelphia sound………………………..25
philanthropically………………………….110
physical abuse……………………………….31
piano distortion……………………………113
Pickett, Wilson……………………………….63
pilot error…………………………………….109
Pink Floyd……………………………………43
Plant, Robert………………………………..211
playlists……………………………………….234
Playboy‘s Playmate of the Month………143
Poco…………………………………………….152, 54
Pointer Sisters……………………………..225
Poland, Polish………………………………..90
police(man)……………………………………98, 247
Polish Solidarity……………………………..90
pool hustler……………………………………31
Porizkova, Paulina…………………………150
Presley, Elvis………………………………….94, 66, 55    (See also Elvis.)
Price, Lloyd…………………………………….78
Prince…………………………………………..202, 57
Prince Charmings………………………………35
promnesia…………………………………….237
prostitution………………………………….226, 79
Prozac………………………………………..212
“Pumped Up Kicks”……………………….198
punk, punk rock……………………………234, 101
Purple Rain……………………………………57
“Pusher, The”……………………………….227
racial discrimination………………………67
Radio Disney………………………………..212
rap(pers)……………………………………..202, 25, 2
Rare Earth……………………………………249
Raspberries………………………………….125, 27
Rawls, Lou……………………………………249, 225
RCA……………………………………………..120
Rebounds……………………………………..19
Record of the Year…………………………..112, 88
Redding, Otis………………………………..201, 58
Redford, Robert…………………………….245
Reid, Mike…………………………………….200
restrictive bandwidth………………………248
rhythm and blues, R & B…………………..235, 193, 104, 86, 78, 68, 67, 31, 25
Richards, Keith……………………………….46
Richrath, Gary…………………………………6
Rio de Janeiro……………………………….103
“River”………………………………………….16
Rivers, Joan…………………………………..132
Rivers, Johnny………………………………..78
Roberge, Mark……………………………….72
Robinson, Smokey…………………………149, 2

Robin Wilson Album 1968………………….64
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame………………243, 213, 194, 193, 108, 80, 31
Rocky IV………………………………………..5
Rogers, Kenny……………………………….121

“Rolling in the Deep”……………………….230
Rolling Stone…………………………………213, 90, 73, 48, 31, 10
(Rolling) Stones……………………………..187, 143, 63, 27
Ronstadt, Linda……………………………..200
Ross, Diana……………………………………31
Royal Albert Hall……………………………176
Russia…………………………………………186
Rutherford, Mike…………………………..158
Salada tea……………………………………..169
Samaritans……………………………………251
Sandé, Emeli………………………………….230
San Francisco………………………………..252, 154, 110
Santana, Carlos………………………………76
Santana, Jorge………………………………..76
semi-wild animals…………………………..15
sax(ophone), saxophonist…………………249, 225, 209, 193, 176, 156, 123, 120, 115, 44,
…………………………………………………..14, 12, 7, 5, 1
Sayer, Leo……………………………………..186
Schon, Neal…………………………………..252
Schmitt, Timothy B.     ………………………209, 120, 54
Scotland………………………………………….53
Seattle…………………………………………….30
Sedaka, Neil…………………………………….94
Sedgwick, Edie…………………………………178
September of My Years……………………..204
sex………………………………………………..226, 160, 7
sexist…………………………………………….178
Sex Pistols……………………………………….142
sexual intercourse…………………………….99
sexually charged……………………………..57
sexually explicit…………………………….234
Shamblin, Allen……………………………..200
Shankar, Ravi………………………………….88
Shelton, Blake…………………………………38
Shrek 2………………………………………….191
Silk Degrees…………………………………….97
Simon, Paul……………………………………229
soft pop, soft rock……………………………173, 70, 64, 9
solo career…………………………………….107
Sondheim, Stephen………………………….250
Song of the Year…………………………….162, 112, 88
Songs About Jane…………………………..207
Son of Beatles…………………………………74

“Soulful Strut”………………………………..33
Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes…..225
Spain, Spanish……………………………….115, 32
Spandex………………………………………..162
spark romance………………………………..52
Special K……………………………………….156
special needs…………………………………..195
Spirit…………………………………………….197
spirituality……………………………………..28
“Spooky”………………………………………155
Springfield, Dusty…………………………… 167
Springsteen, Bruce…………………………..212, 26, 5
Stanley, Michael……………………………….27
Starship…………………………………………36
“Stayin’ Alive”…………………………………..9
Steely Dan…………………………………….162
Stefani, Gwen…………………………………153
Sterno Canned Heat………………………..87
Stewart, Martha…………………………….33
Stewart, Rod………………………………..225, 31
Stipe, Michael………………………………251
Stories………………………………………..32
“Stormy”…………………………………….155
Strange, Giles, Miles and Niles…………106
Streisand, Barbra……………………………66
strings…………………………………………74
“Sugar”…………………………………………207
suicide………………………………………….127, 13
suicide rate…………………………………..251
Super Bowl……………………………………211
surveillance video……………………………152
Survivor………………………………………..122
Sutherland, Kiefer……………………………..8
“Suzie Q”………………………………………..37
Swedish………………………………………..119
Swinney, Wayne…………………………….224
Swiss, Switzerland…………………………115, 20
synthesizer (Moog)………………………..131, 124, 47
Taupin, Bernie………………………………..92
Taylor, Chuck………………………………..236
teenage estrangement……………………..29
teen idol……………………………………….247
Temptations………………………………….149
10cc……………………………………………..98
terrorist attacks…………………………….237
Terry Knight and the Pack………………..63
That Little Ol’ Band From Texas…………145
There’s Something About Mary…………….5
Thielemans, Toots……………………………149
36-24-36…………………………………………228
Three Dog Night………………………………249, 227
thugs………………………………………………56
“Thunder Island”………………………………197
Titanic……………………………………………105
TNT……………………………………………….228
“To Love Somebody”…………………………….9
Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers…………142

Tork, Peter……………………………………..142
Toto………………………………………………243
“Traces”………………………………………..155
T. Rex……………………………………………74
trombone……………………………………..138
troubled childhood………………………….118
Tucker, Tanya………………………………..196
Turner, Ike & Tina……………………………243
Twain, Shania………………………………….91
Twitty, Conway……………………………….78
2K Sports………………………………………..25
Tyler, Steven………………………………….143
Wade, Jason…………………………………..174
wah-wah guitar……………………………….95
Warwick, Dionne……………………………..39
Wayne County Fairgrounds, The…………..26
“Way of Love, The”……………………………29
Weezer…………………………………………198
Wells, Cory……………………………………..58
West, Kanye……………………………………25
wet dream……………………………………246
Wham!  ………………………………………..212
White House…………………………………201
White, Katie………………………………….244
Whitesnake…………………………………..212
Who, The………………………………………..27
Williams, Cindy……………………………….132
Wilson, Brian………………………………….23
Wilson Phillips………………………………196
“Wind of Change”……………………………213
Winwood, Steve……………………………..249
Witherspoon, Reese………………………..231
“Without You”……………………………….229
WKRP in Cincinnati………………………209
wolf………………………………………….192

Womack, Bobby……………………………210
Womack, Harry………………………………21
Wonder, Stevie………………………………94
Wood, Ron…………………………………..187
woods fairies…………………………………24
Woodstock…………………………………….87
Woolfson, Eric…………………………………43
workaday stiffs……………………………….84
World’s Greatest Rock and Roll Band, The……..46

wrong crowd…………………………………41
X-Factor, The……………………………….230
xylophone…………………………………….69
yearnings of one’s heart…………………206
Yearwood, Trisha…………………………..135
“You and Me”…………………………………8
Young-Holt Unlimited………………………33
Young, Neil…………………………………229, 66
You Tube…………………………………….169, 136, 94, 64, 12, 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                          

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Index of Songs in The 252 by Year

Index of Songs in The 252 by Year

 Just look up the year of interest, and this index will list the songs in The 252 from that time.  Maybe it’s the year of your birth, the year you got married, or the year you graduated from high school or college.  Or maybe it’s some other milestone you may have in mind, some special time in your life to which a particular song may be connected.  Possibly you were even wallowing in the pits and took comfort in the music of the day.  Or perhaps you simply dig a particular era.  Whatever!

Hopefully the use of this index will lead you to the tunes that can take you back to where you want to go.

1955
Story Untold                                                         67

1959
The Angels Listened In                                     206
Where Were You (On Our Wedding Day)      193
Hushabye                                                              62

1960
All I Could Do Was Cry                                       31

1962
Having a Party                                                    225
You Don’t Miss Your Water                              201

1963
It Hurts to Be Sixteen                                          94

1964
Yesterday’s Gone                                                217

Today                                                                     121
I’m Happy Just to Dance with You                     93

1965
Early Morning Rain                                              55

Make It Easy on Yourself                                    39

1966
Mustang Sally                                                     235

Just Like a Woman                                             178
(I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone                         142

1967
We Gotta Go Home                                           140

Lawdy Miss Clawdy                                             78
Come Home, Baby                                               63
It’s Cold Outside                                                  27

1968
Feelin’ Alright?                                                   249

Six Man Band                                                      144
All Along the Watchtower                                130
Honey Do                                                             106
Where Are They Now                                          64
Gentle on My Mind                                              51
I Put a Spell on You                                             37
The River Is Wide                                                 30

1969
Everyday with You Girl                                     155
I Got a Line on You                                              65

Try a Little Tenderness                                       58

1970
I Want to Take You Higher                              243

Mississippi Queen                                            183
Fly Little White Dove Fly                                 175
Long Long Time                                                 141
Shilo                                                                     118
Let’s Work Together                                           87
Still Water (Love)                                                  2

1971
The Drum                                                             247
Snowblind Friend                                               227

If Not for You                                                     179
Let Your Love Go                                               173
Lucky Man                                                          124
Toast and Marmalade for Tea                         113
All Day Music                                                      104
I’d Like to Change the World                            96                                                                       Lowdown                                                               95
Rainy Jane                                                             83
Love Her Madly                                                    81
The Story in Your Eyes                                        80
Sour Suite                                                             49
Mammy Blue                                                        32
Do I Love You                                                         3

1972
Glory Bound                                                       229
You Could Have Been a Lady                          215

Love Me Love Me Love                                     214
Rock and Roll                                                     211
Run Run Run                                                      197
Son of My Father                                               131
Taxi                                                                      110
Tiny Dancer                                                         92
Suavecito                                                             76
Summer Sun                                                        45

1973
It Sure Took a Long, Long Time                      192

Bell Bottom Blues                                             181
Painted Ladies                                                   154
One Less Set of Footsteps                               109
Close Your Eyes                                                    89
Pretty Lady                                                           75
Harry Hippie                                                         21
Oh My Lady                                                           19

 1974
Already Gone                                                      196
I Feel a Song (In My Heart)                              194
So You Are a Star                                                132
Showdown                                                             74

1975
Anytime (I’ll Be There)                                      204

Big Yellow Taxi                                                     203
Solitaire                                                                188
My Boy                                                                  163
Changes                                                                100
Rainy Day People                                                  66

1976
Fool for the City                                                  241

The Fire Down Below                                         226
Breezin’                                                                 210
The Homecoming                                                169
Crazy on You                                                        108
It’s Over                                                                  97
I Got to Know                                                        69
Fallen Angel                                                          42

1977
Send in the Clowns                                            250

It’s Sad to Belong                                               220
I Wouldn’t Want to Be Like You                        43
Moondance                                                             7

1978
Lights                                                                    252

FM (No Static at All)                                          209
My Best Friend’s Girl                                        150
Can We Still Be Friends                                    143
Paradise by the Dashboard Light                   129
Change of Heart                                                 125
Runaway          (Jefferson Starship)                  36

1979
I Need Your Help, Barry Manilow                  189

Wait for Me                                                         148
Heartbreaker                                                      137
Does Your Mother Know                                  119
Shadows in the Moonlight                                 91
Highway Song                                                       50
Lady Lynda                                                            23
Hold On                                                                  12
Dance Away                                                           10

1980
Someone That I Used to Love                         238

Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap                          228
Wondering Where the Lions Are                    186
The Seduction                                                     176
What I Like About You                                      172
Do Right                                                               170
Keep the Fire                                                      136
No Night So Long                                               134
On the Road Again                                             117

1981
Just Once                                                              182

Hearts on Fire                                                     152
Hold On Loosely                                                 122
Burnin’ for You                                                   102
No Reply at All                                                     71
Lover                                                                      26
In Your Letter                                                        6

1982
Should I Stay or Should I Go                           234
Holdin’ On                                                           231
No One Like You                                                213
After the Glitter Fades                                    190
I.G.Y. (What a Beautiful World)                      162
Working for the Weekend                                 84
I Do            (J. Geils Band)                                   68
Shakin’                                                                   57
You Got Lucky                                                      47
The One You Love                                                44

1983
My City Was Gone                                              240
Memory                                                                171
Pride and Joy                                                       161
Sharp Dressed Man                                            145
New Year’s Day                                                     90
What About Me?                                                   40
My Kind of Lady                                                    18

1984
Rebel Yell                                                             160
Leave a Tender Moment Alone                       149
Runaway           (Bon Jovi)                                    79
Tender Years                                                           5

1985
I Drink Alone                                                       123
Cry                                                                           98
Centerfield                                                            73
The Captain of Her Heart                                   20
So in Love                                                              14

1986
Love Walks In                                                      208
Taken In                                                               158
In the Shape of a Heart                                    127
Coming Around Again                                         77

1987
You Can Call Me Al                                            138
Stay the Night                                                      59
Unchain My Heart                                                 1

1988
What a Wonderful World                                 151

1989
Call It Love                                                           54

1990
New York Minute                                              237
I Melt with You                                                  139
Almost Hear You Sigh                                        46

1991
Enter Sandman                                                  146
Change                                                                 115

1992
I Can’t Make You Love Me                               200
Restless Heart                                                    107
Always the Last to Know                                    53
Am I the Same Girl                                              33
Start the Car                                                           8

1993
Everybody Hurts                                                 251
Fields of Gold                                                      218
Reason to Believe                                              187
Kiss of Life                                                           167
Tell Me What You Dream                                  120
Run to You                                                             22
Can’t Do a Thing (To Stop Me)                           17

1994
Keep Talking                                                        199

Shut Up and Kiss Me                                          135
Misled                                                                   128
What Might Have Been                                       61
Found Out About You                                          13

1995
How Did I Get By Without You                           11

1996
Flood                                                                      233

Wonder                                                                  195
That Thing You Do!                                             185
Counting Blue Cars                                            165
Just a Girl                                                             153
1979                                                                        41
Insensitive                                                            35
When You’re Gone                                                4

1997
Crash into Me                                                      246
Alone                                                                         9

1998
It’s All Been Done                                               219

My Favorite Mistake                                          105
To the Moon and Back                                         29

1999
Hey Leonardo (She Likes Me for Me)             245

Man!  I Feel like a Woman!                               177
You Get What You Give                                       28

2000
AM Radio                                                              248

You’re an Ocean                                                 180
Yellow                                                                     48

2001
Breathless                                                            133

Island in the Sun                                                  15

2002
Standing Still                                                       159

2003
Rest in Pieces                                                      224

Sunrise                                                                 103
Don’t Know Why                                                  88
Why Can’t I?                                                         82
Peacekeeper                                                        34

2004
100 Years                                                              239                            

Are You Gonna Be My Girl                                221
1985                                                                       212
8th World Wonder                                             205
Accidentally in Love                                          191
White Flag                                                           184

2005
Sunday Morning                                                 207

Better Now                                                          156
Holiday                                                                 101
Home                                                                      38
Somewhere Only We Know                                24

2006
Cab                                                                         242

Breathe (2AM)                                                     236
River                                                                      166
The Real Thing                                                     157

Ever the Same                                                      114
Put Your Records On                                           112

2007
First Time                                                               174

Smile                                                                         56

2008

Just Got Started Loving You                                85
Shattered (Turn the Car Around)                      72

2009

That’s Not My Name                                          244
Come Back to Me                                                116

2010
September                                                            232

This Afternoon                                                     168
Heartbreak Warfare                                             70

2011
For the First Time                                               147

I Do              (Colbie Caillat)                               111
Little Lion Man                                                      99

2012
Next to Me                                                        
     86
Love You Like a Love Song                                 60

2013
#Beautiful                                                            202

Who Do We Think We Are                                   25

2014
Somethin’ Bad            
                                       223
Hot Tonight                                                         198

Brave                                                                    126

2015
Fire Under My Feet                                           230

Marvin Gaye                                                         52

2016
Where the Hell Are My Friends?                     216

Last Christmas                                                      16

2017
Water Under the Bridge                                    222

You Look Good                                                    164



Index of Recording Artists in The 252

Index of Recording Artists in the 252
                 (Honorable Mentions and Special Mentions included!)

Artist                                          
    Song’s Rank 

Abba                                                                119    
AC/DC                                                              228
Adell                                                                222
Allen, Lily                                                          56
Anka, Paul                                                          3
April Wine                                                      215
Arden, Jann                                                      35
Armstrong, Louis                                          151
Association                                                    144
Bareilles, Sara                                               126
Barenaked Ladies                                         219
Beach Boys                                                       23
Beatles                                                              93
Bee Gees                                                             9
Bell, William                                                   201
Bells                                                                  175
Benatar, Pat                                                    137
Benson, George                                              210
Bice, Bo                                                            157
Blackfoot                                                           50
Blessid Union of Souls                                  245
Blue Oyster Cult                                          
  102
Bon Jovi                                                             79
Bowie, David                                                  100
Bowling for Soup                                           212
Bread                                                               173
Browne, Jackson                                           127
Bublé, Michael                                                38
Buckinghams                                                   78
Caillat, Colbie                                                111
Cafferty, John & the Beaver Brown Band    5
Cain, Tané                                                       231
Campbell, Glen                                                51
Canned Heat                                                    87
Carey, Mariah feat. Miguel                         202
Carmen, Eric                                                  125
Carpenter, Mary Chapin                             135
Carpenters                                                     188
Carradine, Keith                                           HM
Carroll, Andrea                                               94
Cars                                                                 150
Cash, Johnny                                                  SM
Cetera, Peter                                                 107
Chad & Jeremy                                              217
Chapin, Harry                                                110
Chicago                                                             95
Choir                                                                 27
Clapton, Eric                                                  181
Clash                                                               234
Classics IV                                                      155
Cocker, Joe                                                        1
Cockburn, Bruce                                          186
Coldplay                                                          48
Cole, Jude                                                         8
Cole, Natalie                                                 238
Collective Soul                                              156
Collins, Judy                                                  250
Cook, David                                                   116
Cooke, Sam                                                    225
Cooper, Alice                                                  SM
Cornelius Brothers & Sister Rose              SM 
Corrs                                                               133
Counting Crows                                            191
Cranberries                                                       4
Creedence Clearwater Revival                    37
Crests                                                             206
Croce, Jim                                                      109
Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young                      HM
Crow, Sheryl                                                  105
Daughtry                                                        232
Davis, Paul                                                     170
Day, Howie                                                     HM
Del Amitri                                                        53
Diamond, Neil                                               118
Dido                                                                 184
Dion, Celine                                                   128
Dishwalla                                                       165
Doobie Brothers                                            SM
Doors                                                                81
Double                                                              20
Dylan, Bob                                                      178
Eagles                                                              196
Edward Bear                                                    89
Electric Light Orchestra                                74
Emerson, Lake & Palmer                             124
England Dan & John Ford Coley                 220
Everclear                                                         248
Fagen, Donald                                               162
Fastball                                                           180
Five for Fighting                                           239
Fleetwood Mac                                               34
Fogerty, John                                                  73
Foghat                                                             241
Forum                                                               30
Four Tops                                                           2
Fry, Glenn                                                        44
Gallery                                                            HM
Genesis                                                            71
Gin Blossoms                                                  13
Giorgio                                                            131
Gladys Knight & the Pips                            194
Godley & Creme                                             98
Gomez, Selena                                                60
Gomm, Ian                                                      12
Grammer, Andy                                            HM
Grass Roots                                                   229
Green Day                                                     101
Guess Who                                                      49
Hall & Oates                                                  148
Hardy, Hagood                                              169
Harrison, George                                          SM
Hatchet, Molly                                              HM
Heart                                                               108
Hendrix, Jimi                                                 130
Henley, Don                                                   237
Houston, Whitney                                          22
Hudson Brothers                                          132
Idol, Billy                                                        160
Isaak, Chris                                                      17
James, Etta                                                       31
Jamestown Massacre                                     45
Jars of Clay                                                     233
Jefferson Starship                                          36
Jet                                                                     221
Jethro Tull                                                        SM
Jewel                                                                159
J. Geils Band                                                     68
Joel, Billy                                                         149
John, Elton                                                        92
Jo Jo Gunne                                                     197
Jones, Davy                                                       83
Jones, Norah                                                    88
Jones, Quincy feat. James Ingram            182
Jones, Tom                                                       SM
Journey                                                            252
Keane                                                                 24
Knight, Terry                                                    63
Lady Antebellum                                           164
Lambert, Miranda ; Carrie Underwood  
  223
LANY                                                                 216
Last, James                                                     176
Led Zeppelin                                                   211
Legend, John feat. Rick Ross                         25
Lewis, Leona                                                   230
Lifehouse                                                        174
Lightfoot, Gordon                                           66
Lighthouse                                                       75
Little Texas                                                      61
Lobo                                                                 192
Locke, Kimberley                                          205
Loggins, Kenny                                              136
Lonestar                                                          HM
Loverboy                                                           84
MacLaughlan, Sara                                       166
Malo                                                                  76
Manilow, Barry                                              171
Maroon 5                                                        207
Matthews, Dave                                            246
Mayer, John                                                     70
McKee, Bonnie                                               HM
Meat Loaf                                                       129
Meisner, Randy                                             152
Merchant, Natalie                                        195
Metallica                                                        146
Mike + The Mechanics                                 158
Mills, Frank                                                    214
Milsap, Ronnie                                               HM
Mitchell, Joni                                                 203
Modern English                                             139
Money, Eddie                                                   57
Monkees                                                         142
Moody Blues                                                    80
Morissette, Alanis                                         SM
Morrison, Van                                                   7
Mountain                                                       183
Moving Pictures                                             40
Mumford & Sons                                            99
Murray, Anne                                                  91
Music Explosion                                            140
Mystics                                                             62
Nalick, Anna                                                  236
Nathanson, Matt                                          HM
Nelson, Willie                                                117
New Christy Minstrels                                121
New Radicals                                                  28
Newton-John, Olivia                                    179
Nickelback                                                    168
Nicks, Stevie                                                 190
No Doubt                                                       153
Nutmegs                                                          67
Oakenfold, feat. Shifty ShellShock           SM
O.A.R.                                                                72
Orchestral Manoeuvers in the Dark          14
Orr, Benjamin                                                 59
Otto, James                                                     85
Parsons, Alan                                                  43
Peter, Paul & Mary                                        55
Petty, Tom & the Heartbreakers                47
Phair, Liz                                                          82
Pickett, Wilson                                              235
Pink Floyd                                                      199
Poco                                                                  54
Pop-Tops                                                          32
Presley, Elvis                                                 163
Pretenders                                                    240
Price, Lloyd                                                   193
Puth, Charlie feat. Meghan Trainor          52
Queen                                                             HM
Rae, Corrine Bailey                                      112
Raitt, Bonnie                                                 200
Rare Earth                                                      SM
R.E.M.                                                              251
REO Speedwagon                                             6
Restless Heart                                              120
Rolling Stones                                                46
Romantics                                                      172
Ronstadt, Linda                                            141
Roxy Music                                                      10
Rundgren, Todd                                            143
Sade                                                                167
Saliva                                                              224
Sandé, Emeli                                                   86
Savage Garden                                               29
Scaggs, Boz                                                      97
Scorpions                                                        213
Script                                                               147
Seekers                                                           HM
Seger, Bob                                                      226
Sheik, Duncan                                                SM
Sherman, Bobby                                           247
Simon, Carly                                                    77
Simon, Paul                                                   138
Simon & Garfunkel                                       SM
Simply Red                                                     103
Sinatra, Frank                                               204
Sly & the Family Stone                                243
Smashing Pumpkins                                      41
Spirit                                                                 65
Splender                                                         HM
Stampeders                                                     19
Stanley, Michael                                             26
Stansfield, Lisa                                              115
Starbuck                                                           69
Steely Dan                                                      209
Steppenwolf                                                  227
Stereophonics                                               HM
Stevens, Ray                                                  189
Stewart, Rod                                                  187
Sting                                                                218
Strangeloves                                                 106
Supertramp                                                     18
Swing Out Sister                                             33
Taylor, Livingston                                         HM
Ten Years After                                               96
.38 Special                                                      122
Thomas, Ian                                                   154
Thomas, Rob                                                  114
Thorogood, George                                      173
Three Dog Night                                             58
Ting Tings                                                       244
Tin Tin                                                             113
Tokyo Police Club                                         198
Traffic                                                              249
Train                                                                242
Twain, Shania                                                177
Uncle Kracker                                                SM
Urban, Keith                                                  HM
U2                                                                      90
Valli, Frankie                                                   42
Van Halen                                                       208
Vaughan, Stevie Ray                                    161
Vertical Horizon                                            SM
Waite, John                                                      11
Walker Brothers                                             39
Walsh, Joe                                                       SM
War                                                                  104
Warwick, Dionne                                          134
Weezer                                                             15
Wham!                                                              16
Who                                                                  SM
Wilson, Robin                                                  64
Womack, Bobby                                              21
Wonder, Stevie                                              SM
Wonders                                                         185
Young, Neil                                                     HM
ZZ Top                                                              145

 

 


 

 

 

 

The 252: Songs That Should’ve Been Bigger

.                 “If music be the food of love, play on.” 
.                                                                          -William Shakespeare

Hello.  Welcome to my post.  I’m calling it…

.       The 252:  Songs That Should’ve Been Bigger       . 

If you’re looking for timeless #1 classics, you’ve come to the wrong place.  You won’t find any here.  In fact, you won’t find any songs that went Top 10.  Some didn’t reach the Top 40; a few didn’t even make the Billboard Hot 100!   Some achieved immense popularity in later years, while others seem to be long forgotten by everyone but me. Obscurity is underrated.

You’ve likely heard (of) many of these songs, but there are also probably quite a few with which you are unfamiliar.  That’s okay.

The exposé that follows these opening remarks examines these recordings that were not huge hits immediately following release.  They should have been more popular with the mainstream audience but were not.  Reasons they were held back from greater success are varied, myriad and often mysterious.

You won’t want to read this all at once.  Check it out bit by bit at your leisure over a period of time.

Almost every song can be found on Google.  Just type the title into the search.  You might want to include the artist to avoid confusion with other songs.  For example, there are two numbers here with the title “I Do”  –  one by The J. Geils Band, another by Colbie Caillat.  There are also two different songs called “Runaway.”  Here’s hoping you look up the songs and watch their accompanying videos.   It’s fun!

For each entry you will find the song title, the recording artist, the year of greatest popularity according to the Billboard Hot 100, and the chart “peak”  –  the highest spot ever attained by the record.  There’s also my brief…well, usually brief… commentary on the recording.

This is some of my favorite music.  Number 1 hits and, to a lesser extent, Top 10 singles have been played to death and one gets tired,  if not downright sick, of them.  Unless you’re an over-the-top, avid listener, there’s no such problem here.

A few applicable rules of which you should be aware:  A recording artist can appear only once on this list, even though he or she or they may have several songs worthy of inclusion. If an artist had a solo career after being with a group, he or she is eligible to cited here as both.  For example, Glenn Fry and Don Henley each made the list as individuals even though they also were members of the Eagles.  Stevie Nicks of Fleetwood Mac is in the same camp, and there are others.  A similar rationale is utilized when a musician is a member of one group then another;  Jay Ferguson and Mark Andes were in Spirit before they formed Jo Jo Gunne.  There’s a song here by each of those bands.

Why so much stuff from the early-to-mid 1970s?   Is it because I was in high school and my early years of college back then and bought a lot of records?   Or was music just better at that time?  You’ll have to trust me on this one!

Actually it’s not as bad as you might think; if you read the Honorable Mention and Special Mention selections first, you’ll be left with the wrong idea because they’re heavily 1970 to 1975.  But truth be told, there is at least one song in the 252 for every year from 1962 through 2017. That’s 56 years in a row, and there are several songs from before that.

Why 252?  Others have made lists with 250 items, and this way I beat them!  (Actually, with the aforementioned extra songs added in, there are 286 total.)

Lastly, but importantly, this is far from an exclusive list.  There are plenty of other great songs that didn’t ride the upper echelons of the charts.  I fully recognize that this effort is little more than the tip of the iceberg.

Well, I think that’s everything.  Time to get started.

.                       “Put your records on;
.                         Tell me your favorite song.”
.                                                           – Corrine Bailey Rae
.
.
.
.

***   Honorable Mention   ***

“American Girl”
Bonnie McKee
2013
Peak:   #87

“A World of Our Own”
The Seekers
1965
Peak:   #19

“Collide”
Howie Day
2005
Peak:   #20

“Come On Get Higher”
Matt Nathanson
2008 – 2009
Peak:   #59

“Flirtin’ with Disaster”
Molly Hatchet
1980
Peak:   #42

“Our House”
Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young
1970
Peak:   #30

“Have a Nice Day”
Stereophonics
2001
Did not chart!

“I Believe in Music”
The Gallery
1972
Peak:   #22

“I’m Already There”
Lonestar
2001
Peak:   #24

“I’m Easy”
Keith Carradine”
1976
Peak:   #17

“I Think God Can Explain”
Splender
2000
Peak:   #62

“I Will Be in Love with You”
Livingston Taylor
1978 – 1979
Peak:   “30

“Keep Your Head Up”
Andy Grammer
2011
Peak:   #53

“Old Man”
Neil Young
1972
Peak:   #31

“Smoky Mountain Rain”
Ronnie Milsap
1981
Peak:   #24

“You’ll Think of Me”
Keith Urban
2004
Peak:   #24

“You’re My Best Friend
Queen
1975
Peak:   #16
.
.
.

***   Special Mention   ***

“Barely Breathing”
Duncan Sheik
1997
Peak:   #16

“Behind Blue Eyes”
The Who
1971
Peak:  #34

“Don’t Ever Be Lonely (A Poor Little Fool Like Me)”
Cornelius Brothers and Sister Rose
1972
Peak:   #23

“Don’t You Worry ‘Bout a Thing”
Stevie Wonder
1974
Peak:   #16

“El Condor Pasa (If I Could)”
Simon & Garfunkel
1970
Peak:   #18

Green, Green Grass of Home
Tom Jones
1967
Peak:  #11

“Hands Clean”
Alanis Morissette
2002
Peak:   #23

“Hey, Big Brother”
Rare Earth
1971 – 1972
Peak:   #19

“Jesus Is Just Alright”
Doobie Brothers
1972
Peak:   #32

“Locomotive Breath”
Jethro Tull
1976
Peak:  #62

“Man in Black”
Johnny Cash
1971
Peak:   #58

“Rocky Mountain Way”
Joe Walsh
1973
Peak:   #23

“Smile”
Uncle Kracker
2010
Peak:   #31

“Starry Eyed Surprise”
Paul Oakenfold feat. Shifty ShellShock
2002
Peak:   #41

“Under My Wheels”
Alice Cooper
1972
Peak:   #59

“You”
George Harrison
1975
Peak:  #20

“You’re a God”
Vertical Horizon
2000
Peak:   #23

.
.
.
.
252      
“Lights”
Journey
1978
Peak:  #68
Journey is from San Francisco and this song, written by lead singer Steve Perry and guitarist Neal Schon, is about that city.   Well, that’s how it turned out anyway.  Perry was in Los Angeles and on the verge of joining Journey.  He says, “I had the song written in Los Angeles almost completely except for the bridge and it was written about Los Angeles.  It was, ‘When the lights go down in the city and the sun shines on L.A.’ ”  I’ll bet you didn’t know that!  The song through the years would become one of Journey’s most famous, despite never sniffing the Top 40.

251
“Everybody Hurts”
R.E.M.
1993
Peak:  #29
The Samaritans were a secular emotional-support-for-the-suicidal organization in Britain.  In 1995 they were alarmed at the high suicide rate of young men in their geographic region and the reluctance of those men to seek help, so they started an advertising campaign.  It was nothing more than the lyrics to this song and their hotline number.  Lead singer Michael Stipe, who intentionally sings so he’s difficult to understand, enunciated very clearly to make sure the message got through.  The state of Nevada, which also has a high rate of teenage suicide, praised R.E.M. for their part in addressing the problem.  Stipe is proud the R.E.M. song has saved lives, as well he should be.   Strings on the record were arranged by Led Zeppelin’s John Paul Jones.

250
“Send In the Clowns”
Judy Collins
1977
Peak:   #19
Stephen Sondheim wrote this for the musical A Little Night Music.  It was intended to fit the plot.  The “clowns” were fools and the ending line “Don’t bother, they’re here” means that “we’re the fools.”  Judy Collins had the perfect voice to make a hit out of this beautiful but very sad number about a lifetime filled with regret and the irony of it.


249
“Feelin’ Alright?”
Traffic
1968
Peak:   Did not chart!
The subtleties of Traffic’s original version, with its exquisite piano, saxophone, melancholy lyrics and question mark in the title, make it superior to Joe Cocker’s cover.  Cocker released it twice and it charted both times, as it did for two other recording artists, one of which was Grand Funk Railroad.  Others to record it include the Fifth Dimension, Gladys Knight & The Pips, Isaac Hayes, the Jackson 5, Rare Earth, Lou Rawls, and Three Dog Night.  Overall it’s been covered by at least 45 acts.  Traffic consisted of four musicians, two of which were Steve Winwood and Dave Mason.  Mason wrote this rock classic that wasn’t a hit for the original performers.

248
“AM Radio”
Everclear
2000
Peak:  Did not chart!
AM radio stations once ruled the day, and the years 1970, 1972, 1975 and 1977 are specifically cited in this tribute.  The Ford Pinto, bell bottoms and 8-track tapes are also mentioned to further capture the mood of the era.  The song’s vocals were made to mimic the sound of AM radio, when the transmission didn’t allow for a lot of bass because of restrictive bandwidth.

247
“The Drum”
Bobby Sherman
1971
Peak:   #29
Can schmaltzy stuff attain perfection?  Sherman was a teen idol around 1970.  He would retire from music and acting later in the decade to become a paramedic and a policeman!  But he did so with seven Top 40 hits in the rear view mirror.  Young women used to scream uncontrollably at his concerts, causing Sherman to suffer hearing loss.  In addition to singing, Sherman learned to play 16 musical instruments.

246
“Crash into Me”
The Dave Matthews Band
1997
Peak:  Did not chart!
Didn’t make the Hot 100 but what nominated for a Grammy.  What’s it about?  It’s often mistaken for a love song, with enough lyrical lines to justify such thinking.  But it’s really about voyeurism;  Matthews used the phrase “peeping toms” in discussing it.  The singer, outside and watching the object of his lusty, juvenile desire through a window, probably sees her in a bathrobe because he sings, “Tied up and twisted the way I’d like to be.”  He’s picturing himself with his arms around her from behind.  Kinky stuff for a pop song, which may explain why it failed to chart.  But there are sufficient lines for other interpretations too.  Among them:  masturbation, wet dream, the complex emotion love brings, a love triangle, and perhaps as many more as there are listeners.

245
“Hey Leonardo (She Likes Me for Me)”
Blessid Union of Souls
1999
Peak:   #33
Leonardo DiCaprio, Tyson Beckford, Robert Redford, Cindy Crawford and Jim Carrey ae among the celebrities mentioned in this upbeat number.  It’s about being loved for who you are, even if you lack the traits that make these are other stars desirable. Blessid Union of Souls is from Cincinnati, Ohio.  They had bigger hits, but the message here, though delivered with humor, is spot on.

244
“That’s Not My Name”
The Ting Tings
2009
Peak:   #39
Only Top 40 hit for the British duo.  Singer Katie White says it’s her “ranting about my frustrations with the recording industry.”  A critic called the 45 “a well-shaken can of cola…brimming with sticky, yummy, fizzy goodness.”  The song’s style reminds me of another one-hit wonder  –  Toni Basil with “Mickey” almost 30 years earlier.

243
“I Want to Take You Higher”
Sly and the Family Stone
1970
Peak:   #38
Though Ike and Tina Turner covered  the song the same year and actually charted slightly higher, Sylvester “Sly Stone” Stewart wrote and produced it, and his funky version was better.  The song was covered too by the Jackson 5, Duran Duran and Toto, among others.  “I Want to Take You Higher” would have benefitted by being shorter than five and a half minutes.  A Rock and Roll Hall of Fame exhibit in the late 1990s was dubbed “I Want to Take You Higher: The Psychedelic Era 1965-1969,” and there was a book with the same title.

242
“Cab”
Train

2006
Peak:  Did Not Chart!
Inspiration for the song was the loneliness Pat Monahan felt after his 2004 divorce.  He says, “You don’t choose your experiences; they choose you.”  It seems he wrote the lyrics as a cathartic exercise; consider the lines, “This new rhythm I pursue is just my getting over you.  I’m telling myself that I need to.”

241
“Fool for the City”
Foghat
1976
Peak:   #45
From the album of the same name.  I’ve lived most of my life in the country and prefer it; here’s the opposite point of view.  It’s not about a particular city but rather city life in general.  The lyrics actually extol the virtues of life in the boonies, but no matter  – the narrator desires urbia.  “Breathing all the clean air, sitting in the sun.  When I get my train fare, I get up and run.  I’m ready for the city.  Air pollution, here I come!” Yeah, I’d say he’s definitely a fool for the city.  Hard driving, monotonous, but unapologetic rock and roll.

240
“My City Was Gone” 
The Pretenders
1983
Peak:   Did not chart!
This would have been called “Ohio” if not for the CSNY song with that title.  Chrissy Hynde wrote it; she was from Akron.  Conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh has used the song’s opening as the lead-in to his talk radio show for more than 30 years.  Limbaugh hadn’t asked permission, and EMI ordered him to stop.  He did so until the liberal Hynde said her parents listen to him all the time and that she didn’t object to him using her song.

239
“100 Years”
Five for Fighting
2004
Peak:   #28
As might be expected, this song was huge on the adult contemporary chart, sitting at #1 for 12 weeks total after three different ascensions to that spot.  It’s a simple tune about how precious life is as we move through its various stages.  We should live in the moment and be grateful for everything.  By song’s end the narrator is 99 and “dying for just another moment.”  Most of us get there sooner, but ain’t it the truth?

 238
“Someone That I Used to Love”
Natalie Cole
1980
Peak:   #21
She decides, sadly, that moving on is better than ripping up her heart over someone for whom her best wasn’t enough.  Famed lyricist Gerry Goffin wrote the words; “Someone That I Used to Love” was one of over 100 chart hits for the prolific native New Yorker. Not long after this record, Cole fell heavily into drugs but recovered later in the decade.  She never really tried to escape her father’s long shadow and won seven Grammys for her album Unforgettable…With Love, on which she covered many of her dad’s standards.  Cole died of heart failure on New Year’s Eve in 2015.  She was 65 years old. 

237
“New York Minute”
Don Henley
1990
Peak:   #48                                                                                                                                         In 
parapsychology “promnesia” loosely means “memory of the future.”  Did Henley experience a touch of it with respect to 9-11, even though the song peaked more than 10 years before the infamous terrorist attacks on The City That Never Sleeps?  The melody has a haunting, despairing, ominous tone to it.  And consider these lyrics: “Harry got up, dressed all in black, went down to the station, and he never came back… In a New York minute, everything can change… You hear the sirens wail. Somebody’s going to emergency…The wolf is always at the door…You better take care of your own.  One day they’re here, next day they’re gone…The groaning city in the gathering dark.”  Eerie stuff, no?

236
“Breathe (2 AM)”
Anna Nalick
2006 
Peak:   #45
Music critic Chuck Taylor called it “an introspective yet confessional tale about learning to handle everyday challenges.”  It’s getting beyond the blunders we all make and moving on.   In the first verse the blunder is becoming pregnant by a man you don’t love.   Wise if sobering message in the chorus:  “You can’t jump the track; we’re like cars on a cable.  And life’s like an hourglass glued to the table.  No one can find the rewind button.”  Ah, but isn’t a visit to an abortion clinic an attempt to find that elusive button? “Breathe (2 AM)” was included in the Hot 100 for 34 weeks, thus tying the record for most weeks on the chart without reaching the Top 40.

 235
“Mustang Sally”
Wilson Pickett
1966 
Peak:   #23
“Mustang Sally” comes awful close to being rhythm and blues at its best.  It’s about a girl who wildly runs around town in her new car, purchased for her by the narrator (singer), whom she now tends to ignore in favor of her oh-so-sweet ride.  He admonishes her to slow down, literally and figuratively, with the line “Oh, I got to put your flat feet on the ground.”

234
“Should I Stay or Should I Go?”

The Clash
1982
Peak:   #45
The song originally contained the line, “On your front or on your back,” which was deemed too sexually explicit to expect radio stations’ playlists to embrace it.  So the line was changed to the much more generic, “If you want me off your back.”  Interestingly, the line, “You’re happy when I’m on my knees” wasn’t touched.  “Should I Stay or Should I Go?” was among the English punk band’s few fine moments.

233
“Flood”
Jars of Clay
1996
Peak:  #37
Few songs have ever gotten airplay on both alternative rock and contemporary Christian stations, but this one did.  Since Jars of Clay is a contemporary Christian group, folks assume this song is about God inundating all the earth, but such is not the case.  The band has indignantly said it’s not “about Noah,” though the line in the hook, “If I can’t swim after 40 days” certainly lends credence to those who say it’s about the great flood.  Genesis 7:12 reads, “And the rain was upon the earth forty days and forty nights.”

232

“September”
Daughtry
2010
Peak:   #36
“September” was Daughtry’s eighth and last Top 40 hit.   Six of the others did better and the remaining one equaled it, but this was one of his better songs.  That’s both my opinion and his.  It was inspired by Chris Daughtry’s formative years with his brother in small-town North Carolina.  The only feasible explanation for this song’s failure to chart higher is that the listening public had tired of the distinctive Daughtry sound; his aforementioned hits had all come in the previous 3½ years.

231
“Holdin’ On”
Tané Cain
1982
Peak:  #37
She put out only one album and two singles.  She was at the time married to Journey’s Jonathan Cain, who wrote this song.  She didn’t appreciate critics saying she sounded like Pat Benatar, but she did.  Cain was also an actress; she would play Reese Witherspoon’s mother in the Legally Blonde movies.

230
“Fire Under My Feet”
Leona Lewis
2015
Peak:   Did not chart!
To me it’s a cross between Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep” and Emeli Sandé’s “Next to Me.” (See #86.)   All three women hail from Great Britain.  “Fire Under My Feet” is an attempted comeback for Lewis, who won Britain’s The X Factor in 2006 and released at least one single each year thereafter through 2013.  In 2014…nothing.  Except leaving the only record label she’d ever been with in favor of a different one.  The failure of this song (didn’t chart in the U.S., didn’t make the Top 40 in her native land) had to be a disappointment to Lewis.

229
“Glory Bound”
The Grass Roots
1972
Peak:  #34
This group had 14 Top 40 hits in the mid 1960s to early 1970s; “Glory Bound” was the second-to-last of them.  Their sound was built for AM radio  –  uptempo, infectious stuff that was easy to sing along to.  It got in your head.  The “band” consisted of three different groups of musicians that were billed as the Grass Roots.  On the March 25, 1972 chart in which “Glory Bound” peaked, the songs that were in the Top 10 included America’s “A Horse With No Name,” Neil Young’s “Heart of Gold,”  Robert John’s “The Lion Sleeps Tonight,” Paul Simon’s “Mother and Child Reunion,” Nilsson’s “Without You,” and Cher’s “The Way of Love.”  I own five of those six songs on 45s and the sixth one on an album.  Do I have “Glory Bound” on a single?  You bet!  It should’ve charted higher, but to say it belonged in the Top 10 with such heady company would be quite a reach.

228
“Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap”
AC/DC
1980
Peak:   Did not chart!
Australian, hard-rocking AC/DC sought album sales success and achieved it.  Chart singles were secondary if not incidental.  The singer here is a hit man; among his dirty deed offers to the listener are concrete shoes, cyanide, TNT, neckties, contracts, and high voltage.  The singer invites those with school, domestic or other problems to call him at 36-24-36.  An Illinois couple sued because they got hundreds of calls to their number, which was 362-4368.  What sounded to them like “8” was actually “Hey!”  This song was released in other parts of the world before it was released in this country, which is very unusual because the U.S. is where the money is when it comes to pop music.  But remember:  Singles weren’t the focus!

227
“Snowblind Friend”
Steppenwolf
1971
Peak:   #60
Hoyt Axton wrote this, as well as the better-known “The Pusher.”  Both were songs damning hard drugs and what they do to users.  He also wrote the Three Dog Night hits “Joy to the World” and “Never Been to Spain.”  A sampling of the lyrics to “Snowblind Friend”:  “Stoned on some new potion he found upon the wall of some unholy bathroom in some ungodly hall,” and “He said he wanted heaven but prayin’ was too slow, so he bought a one-way ticket on an airline made of snow.”

226
“The Fire Down Below”
Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band
1976
Peak:   Did not chart!
About prostitution, how customers come from all walks of life, and how the oldest profession thrives everywhere.  Advice columnist Ann Landers denounced it for extolling sex.  But Seger was unaffected, later releasing “The Horizontal Bop,” which had lyrics that made “The Fire Down Below” seem mild by comparison.

225
“Having a Party”
Sam Cooke
1962
Peak:  #17
Cooke wrote it.   The recording session was a blast, which matched the title and the feel of the song.  Lots of friends were there dancing. Two drummers, two bass guitars, two lead guitars, a piano, a sax, six violins, two violas, two cellos, and backing vocalist Lou Rawls comprised a supporting cast uncommon at the time. Cooke always ended his concerts with this number, often with his warm-up acts joining him on stage.  Rod Stewart took a cover version to the Top 40 more than 20 years later.  It had previously been covered by the Pointer Sisters, Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes, and Luther Vandross.

224
“Rest in Pieces”
Saliva
2003
Peak:   #93
Saliva hails from Memphis, Tennessee.  They’ve had two Hot 100 entries; both came in this calendar year.  They also toured in 2003, opening shows for Kiss and Aerosmith; they were selected over Billy Idol for the tour.  Lead guitarist Wayne Swinney is the only band member to have been with the group since its inception in 1996.  They’re still going, but without much success over the past five years.  So “Rest in Pieces” can be considered a diamond in the rough.

223
“Somethin’ Bad”
Miranda Lambert duet with Carrie Underwood
2014
Peak:  #19
Went to #1 on country chart, becoming the first duet by female solo artists in over 20 years to do so.  The two had been wanting to collaborate for a long while.  Said Lambert, “It took me forever to write the email to ask her, like I was writing to someone I had a crush on and you don’t want to mess it up.”   Underwood didn’t respond for a week, causing Lambert to think Underwood hates her and hates the song!  But Underwood’s long-awaited response was, “I think it’s awesome; let’s do it.” Lambert felt the song was “a meshing of our styles” and that it was “really rock and roll” more than country.  To express her thanks, Lambert gifted Underwood with the motorcycle Underwood had ridden in the video.

222
“Water Under the Bridge”
Adell
2017
Peak:   #26
Adell wrote this mid-tempo number in which the listener can hear influences of disco and gospel, and of course that amazing voice.  A music critic noted the song “sacrifices none of Adell’s trademarked intimacy.”  So let’s see…Disco, gospel, and intimacy all prominent in the same song.  So how could it stall so far short of the Top 10?

221
“Are You Gonna Be My Girl”
Jet
2004
Peak:   #29                                                                                                                                               Australian rock band Jet’s signature song utilized an early Motown swing beat some 40 years later.  They employed an obvious, childish, I-don’t-care-what-you-think rhyme scheme in a song about watching and wanting a stripper in a club.  ” Now you don’t need the money when you look like that, do ya, honey?”

220
“It’s Sad to Belong”
England Dan & John Ford Coley
1977
Peak:   #21
Considered by some a “timeless classic,” this song spent five straight weeks atop the Easy Listening chart, which is now called Adult Contemporary.  The duo had four other songs go to #1 on that chart.  Easy on the ears, indeed.

219
“It’s All Been Done”
Barenaked Ladies
1998 – 1999
Peak:   #44
It’ll soon be 10 years that this song has been played at Detroit Red Wings home hockey games. Songwriter Stephen Page felt his previous song, “Brian Wilson,” had been too verbal and sought to write something more simplistic, which explains the “woo hoo hoo” chorus.  In BNL’s native Canada this was a #1 song.  It didn’t do nearly so well on the rest of the planet.

218
“Fields of Gold”
Sting
1993
Peak:   #23
Sting wrote it.  While “Fields of Gold” wasn’t a big hit in the U.S. or his native United Kingdom, it has blossomed into one of his best-known songs.  It’s really now a middle-of-the-road standard and has been covered by many.  The wistful lyrics made this simple tune what it was:  “Many years have passed since those summer days among the fields of barley.  See the children run as the sun goes down among the fields of gold.”  Sting had just purchased a house near vast barley fields.

217
“Yesterday’s Gone”
Chad & Jeremy
1964
Peak:   #21
The first song Chad Stewart ever wrote, though he gave co-writing credit to the woman who let him compose the song on her piano!  The arranger/producer of the song insisted on the soft, almost whispery  vocals (as opposed to “belting it out”) heard on the recording.  The so-called “British Invasion” helped “Yesterday’s Gone” in the United States.

216
“Where the Hell Are My Friends?”
LANY
2016
Peak:  Did not chart!
How about these opening lyrics to a song by an unknown group?  “Where the hell are my friends?  Home alone, not again.  Friday, wine, and the Internet  –  The only love I seem to get.”  LANY is an alternative electronic trio from Los Angeles.  Their name is an acronym for “Los Angeles New York.”  It’s pronounced “Lay-Nee.”

215
“You Could Have Been a Lady”
April Wine
1972
Peak:   #32
This record was a cover of Hot Chocolate’s original version, which never attained popularity.  Although you may have never heard of April Wine, the Canadian band has released over 20 albums since its inception in 1969.  The group has undergone many lineup changes; in its various reincarnations almost 20 musicians have been members of the hard-rocking band.  “You Could Have Been a Lady” was one of only three Top 40 hits in the U.S.A.

214
“Love Me Love Me Love”
Frank Mills
1972
Peak:   #46
His only Top 40 hit was the instrumental “Music Box Dancer,” which peaked at #3.  This makes me wonder if I was the only person to buy the 45 “Love Me Love Me Love.”  It probably would’ve done better on the charts if it had followed “Music Box Dancer” rather than preceding it.  Gotta love a harmonica-driven number, right?  “I went back to the corner to hear the organ play.  A policeman said the old man died one cold November day.  I waited for a minute then sadly walked away.  Though I couldn’t see the old man, I’m sure I heard him say, ‘If you love me love me love,  why did you ever leave me, girl?'”

213
“No One Like You”
Scorpions
1982
Peak:   #65
Arguably one of the two best songs by Scorpions (“Wind of Change” being the other).  The German band has sold more than 100,000,000 records worldwide.  They’ve been a group for 52 years.  Rolling Stone called them “the heroes of heavy metal.”  MTV  said, “Ambassadors of rock.”  The Scorpions have a star on the Hollywood RockWalk.  Prejudice against heavy metal and a dearth of Hot 100 singles has kept them from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

212
“1985”
Bowling for Soup
2004
Peak:   #23
The song itself is more than 10 years old; its topic is more than 30 years old.   Nostalgia, anyone?  Among the musicians mentioned from the mid-1980s:  Whitesnake, Bruce Springsteen, Madonna, U2, Blondie, Wham!, Limp Biscuit, Duran Duran, Van Halen, and Motley Crue.  Kind of like checking out this list of non-Top 10ers, huh?  Memories come flooding back!  A recording of the song for Radio Disney cleaned up the lyrics a bit.  For example, “One Prozac a day” became “One workout a day” and “She was gonna shake her ass” became the milder “She was gonna shake it right.” 

211
“Rock and Roll”
Led Zeppelin
1972
Peak:   #47
This is one of few Led Zeppelin songs in which all four band members  –  Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham  –  received writing credits.  At inception it was called “It’s Been a Long Time.”    Thirty years later Cadillac’s “Break Through” ad campaign made “Rock and Roll” the first Led Zeppelin song to be used in commercials, which debuted in the 2002 Super Bowl.  Sales of the luxury car would rise in the next year by a healthy 16%.

210
“Breezin'”
George Benson
1976
Peak:   #63
Instrumentals are at an inherent disadvantage because listeners have no chance to relate to nonexistent lyrics, but this number has become something of a standard in jazz music.  It was written by Bobby Womack, who has a song at #21 on this list.  Benson’s album of the same name went to #1 on the album chart.

209
“FM (No Static At All)”
Steely Dan
1978
Peak:  #22
Frontmen Donald Fagen and Walter Becker wrote this for the movie FM, which is set in a radio station and paved the way for the television comedy WKRP in Cincinnati.   At the time FM was just coming into its own.  The song is a blues, jazz and rock hybrid, as were many Steely Dan efforts.  Eagles stalwarts Glenn Frey, Don Henley and Timothy B. Schmitt sang background vocals.  Unfortunately the movie tanked at the box office. However,  a music critic called it “a shining gem” and added, “It’s polished, it’s got hooks, it’s got cool lyrics, it’s got great guitar, and it’s got smooth sax.” Fagen believes the failure of the movie kept the song from doing better on the charts.

208
“Love Walks In”
Van Halen
1986
Peak:   #22
A song about aliens.  A metaphor for new love in one’s life?  Van Halen seeking new fans?  Nope.  It’s about aliens, literally.  New lead singer Sammy Hagar wrote the words, and he claims to have had out-of-body experiences with extraterrestrials on numerous occasions.  He calls the ETs “The Nine” because, in his words now, “They’re from the Ninth Dimension.”  He adds, “Anyone who thinks we’re the only ones here, despite the vastness of the entire universe, is fucking crazy.”

207
“Sunday Morning”
Maroon 5
2005
Peak:   #31
“Sunday Morning” was the fourth single from their ridiculously successful debut album Songs About Jane.  The music released by Maroon 5 since has not been nearly as good.  They’ve become formulaic and are clearly putting out stuff that panders to Top 40 radio.  (“Sugar” is a good example. )   These guys were far more artistic and not so much Adam Levine with his back-up band back in the days of “Sunday Morning.”

206
“The Angels Listened In”
The Crests
1959
Peak:  #22
The composition of this tune certainly followed the blueprint that was in place for pop music in the ’50s.  Still, there’s something charming about the notion that angels are listening and fulfilling the yearnings of one’s heart.  Those who think, “If you’ve heard one Fifties song, you’ve heard them all” need to think again.

205
“8th World Wonder”
Kimberley Locke
2004
Peak:   #49
Locke finished third in the 2003 American Idol competition.  This is her only Hot 100 single, as she has set her goals on adult contemporary.  She experienced success in that through 2008 but mostly with Christmas songs, for which her cheery voice is ideal.
The concept of this song is juvenile:  In a mere week the singer falls head over heels for a guy she perceives to be as amazing as the seven wonders of the world.

204
“Anytime (I’ll Be There)”
Frank Sinatra
1975
Peak:   #75
As the previous generation’s crooner, 59-year-old Ol’ Blue Eyes’ voice was beyond its pinnacle and at times sounds almost tortured here.  But overall he does all right on this Paul Anka-penned number.  In 1965 Sinatra recorded an album entitled September of My Years  – and this song came along a full decade after that!  But if we’re talking popular music in the 20th century, only three other acts could hold a candle to him: Bing Crosby, Elvis and the Beatles.

203
“Big Yellow Taxi”
Joni Mitchell
1975
Peak:   #24
Studio version stalled at #67 in 1970; live version released in ’74 did much better. Counting Crows version with Vanessa Carlton peaked just outside the Top 40 in 2003. Mitchell’s first trip to Hawaii resulted in the writing of this song.  She awoke in the morning, looked out her window at the mountains, then looked down and saw seemingly infinite pavement.  Hence, the classic line, “They paved paradise and put up a parking lot.”  Tune was also covered by Bob Dylan, Percy Faith and Amy Grant, among others.  Mitchell believes her song has become part of the culture  –  and she’s right.

202
“#Beautiful”
Mariah Carey feat. Miguel
2013
Peak:   #15
Mariah Carey has had an absurd total of 18 chart-topping singles, 14 of which came in the Nineties.  This song is retro to that era, so it’s a mystery to pop music aficionados and music critics why it didn’t reach the rarefied air of her heyday.  Miguel has been compared as a vocalist to Prince, so don’t blame his presence on the record for somehow weighing it down. More likely it’s the listener.  Maybe the public’s musical tastes have changed.  Maybe rap and hip-hop have worn us down.  But there are no “maybes” about this:   If you back “#Beautiful” up 20 years, it’s right there with Mariah’s others.

201
“You Don’t Miss Your Water”
William Bell
1962
Peak:   #95
Bell wrote this himself and it became his signature song as well as a classic of Memphis Soul. (Motown production might have helped it.)  When your work is covered by the greats, you know you’ve got something.  Here it was Otis Redding, the Byrds, and Jerry Lee Lewis, among others.  “You Don’t Miss Your Water” was the first of almost 50 singles released by Bell, but he never had a Top 40 hit.  In 2013, at the age of 77, Bell performed this song in the East Room of the White House for an audience that included President and Mrs. Obama, front and center.  Bell looked and sounded great, and it’s Booker T. Jones of Booker T. & the M.G.’s on the organ.  Just Google “William Bell performs ‘You Don’t Miss Your Water’ In Performance at the White House.”

200
“I Can’t Make You Love Me”
Bonnie Raitt
1992
Peak:   #18
This was created by Nashville country music songwriters Mike Reid and Allen Shamblin over more than half a year.  Shamblin:  “One day [Reid] said, ‘Come up to the living room,’ where his piano was.  He sat down and started playing this melody, and it was one of the most moving pieces of music I’d heard.  I mean, it hit me in a hard way…Instantly I knew it was the best thing I’d ever been part of.”  They slowed the tempo to increase the melodrama.  They had in mind three recording artists to give it to; Bette Midler and Linda Ronstadt were the others.  Reid originally conceived the song in reading about a drunk shooting at his girlfriend’s car.  The man said in court, “I learned, Your Honor, that you can’t make a woman love you if she don’t.”  Raitt recorded the song in one take, admitting later that she couldn’t recapture the sad emotion in subsequent takes.  Covered by Adele.

199
“Keep Talking”
Pink Floyd
1994
Peak:   Did not chart!
From the underrated album The Division Bell.  At times uses Steven Hawking’s electronic voice.  The song implies that we can talk problems through.  One of the three songwriters was David Gilmour; he says, “It’s more of a wish than a belief.”  The unmistakable Pink Floyd sound is in full force here, and the female vocals are a nice added touch.

198
“Hot Tonight”
Tokyo Police Club
2014
Peak:   Did not chart!
Indie group formed in 2005.  The closest this group has come to making it is rubbing elbows with those who have.  Opened for Weezer, who also have a song in this lengthy treatise (See #15.), in 2008, and performed with Foster the People (“Pumped Up Kicks”) in 2012.  They’ve played numerous festivals and released 16 singles, none of which have really done anything on the pop charts, even in their native Canada.  But sometimes a group just needs a break.  Anyway, I know a worthy song when I hear one.

197
“Run, Run, Run
Jo Jo Gunne
1972

Peak:   #27
There’s a good reason this number is reminiscent of Spirit’s “I Got a Line on You,” which we’ll get to further up (or is it “down?”) this list.   (See #65.)  Both songs feature a “full” rock sound.  The common denominators are vocalist and keyboard player Jay Ferguson and bass guitarist Mark Andes.  Ferguson would later have a solo hit  –  1978’s “Thunder Island.”

196
“Already Gone”
The Eagles
1974
Peak:   #32
Few juiced-up rockers are melodic, but here’s one that is.  It became a staple of the Eagles’ concert performances, as well it should have been.  “Already Gone” was covered by Tanya Tucker almost 20 years later and by Wilson Phillips 30 years later.  Glenn Frey, who didn’t write the song, sang it and has declared, ” ‘Already Gone’  –  That’s me being happier; that’s me being free.”

195
“Wonder”
Natalie Merchant
1996
Peak:   #20
Inspired by her work with special needs children at a summer camp way back in the Seventies when Merchant was still in her early teens.  Specifically it was about a woman handicapped with a congenital condition since birth.  It’s about overcoming what appear to be insurmountable challenges.  Says Merchant, “I’ve met a lot of people through this song, and they told me that they’ve taken it on as their song, that it describes them.  It describes their strengths in spite of what others would see as deficiencies.”

194
“I Feel a Song (In My Heart)”
Gladys Knight & The Pips
1974
Peak:   #21
To be sure, the lady had soul.  The Pips were her brother and a couple cousins.  They had 26 Top 40 singles, eight of which went Top 10.   The recording career spanned more than a quarter of a century; the group was on the charts from 1961 to 1988.  They’re members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but Gladys Knight and The Pips would be a good reason to change the name to Rock and SOUL Hall of Fame.

193
“Where Were You  (On Our Wedding Day)?”
Lloyd Price
1959
Peak:   #23
I like Fifties music and I like saxophone.  ‘Nuff said.  Nicknamed “Mr. Personality,” Price was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.  And deservedly so.  The song was one of 10 Top 40 hits.  On the more black-oriented rhythm and blues chart, he amassed 14 Top 10 singles.  In the more enlightened day and age in which we now live, in which theoretically everyone gets a fair shot regardless of race, he would have been a superstar.  In the same league as Elvis.

192
“It Sure Took a Long, Long Time”
Lobo
1973
Peak:   #27
“Lobo” is the Spanish word for “wolf,” but his real name is Roland Kent LaVoie.  In the early 1970s he had eight Top 40 singles, all of which he wrote himself.  The melodies were simple but catchy, as was the case here, and he was a fine lyricist.  Like this one, his songs were about love relationships.

191
“Accidentally in Love”
Counting Crows
2004
Peak:   #39
On the soundtrack for the movie Shrek 2 and nominated for an Oscar for Best Original Song.  Lead singer Adam Duritz, who wrote it:  “My songs for Counting Crows are mature and generally don’t get a chance to reach kids.  To be part of something like that is pretty cool.”  He had written “Accidentally in Love” on demand, just for the movie, and he doesn’t normally work that way.  The only requirement is that it had to be “uplifting”  –  and it is.

190
“After the Glitter Fades”
Stevie Nicks
1982
Peak:   #32
Want proof that she could have been all-the-rage if she’d gone into country music? Well, here you go.  It’s an autobiographical song written by Nicks herself (Is that redundant?), probably in the early 1970s and certainly before the great success of Fleetwood Mac in the late ’70s.  Regarding the line, “The loneliness of a one-night stand is hard to take,” Nicks says it wasn’t about a man but rather about performing in a town then scurrying off to the next one.  She said, “I was talking about your one-night stands where you run in, played, and left.”

189
“I Need Your Help, Barry Manilow”
Ray Stevens
1979
Peak:   #49
A clever, lyrically brilliant parody.  And it sounds like a Barry Manilow tune.  The narrator cites his misfortunes and concludes that a Manilow song could comfort him because “no one knows how to suffer quite like you.”  A spoken piece toward the end of the record mentions seven Manilow song titles.  Manilow never met Ray Stevens but nonetheless sent a telegram, which said in part, “I’m knocked out by the record.  It’s the most flattering thing to happen to me in a long time.”  Give this a listen and have some fun!

188
“Solitaire”
The Carpenters
1975
Peak:   #17
Karen Carpenter fancied herself a drummer who sang!  When I was in college, I declared that she had the best female voice in pop music.  A black friend challenged that assertion.  I said he couldn’t name a black female singer who’s better.  He said,

“Gladys Knight.”  I scoffed, shook my head, smirked and said dismissively, “No.”  I added, “Roberta Flack, maybe.”  This song’s soft, too-slow first minute probably held it back from bigger things.  Richard Carpenter has said his late sister didn’t care for the song and never changed her mind.  However, it may have highlighted her vocal ability as well as anything else she ever did. 

187
“Reason to Believe”
Rod Stewart
1993
Peak:   #19
Stewart released the song originally in 1971, but it was overshadowed by its B-side, “Maggie Mae,” and peaked well short of the Top 40.  An unplugged version did much better 22 years later.  It was done live with Ron Wood of the Rolling Stones, who had played with Stewart in the Faces in the early 1970s at the time of the first recording. Infusing his singing with passion was always a forte for Stewart, and it’s evident here.

186
“Wondering Where the Lions Are”
Bruce Cockburn
1980
Peak:   #21
Perhaps it’s too late, but the man’s last name is pronounced “Co-burn.”  This song is his only Top 40 hit in the United States, though he would have seven singles go higher in his native Canada than this one did.  It had a different sound for AM airplay as the new decade settled in and has been covered by both Leo Sayer and Jimmy Buffet.  At the time the song was written, China and Russia were contemplating nuclear war.  One night Coburn repeated a dream he’d had years before, with one important difference.  Lions still wandered the streets, only this second time they were not scary and threatening.  He wrote the first few verses of “Wondering Where the Lions Are”  while driving from town the next morning.  The dream had apparently eased his concerns about nuclear holocaust.

185
“That Thing You Do!”
The Wonders
1996
Peak:   #41
Missed the sacred Top 40 by one spot!  From the movie of the same name, in which “The One-ders,” a fictional Sixties group, win a talent show with this song.  It then climbs into the Top 10.  It was nowhere near so successful in real life, although it was nominated for an Oscar for Best Original Song.  True to the era it was supposed to be from with its British Invasion sound.

184
“White Flag”
Dido
2004
Peak:   #18
This number was nominated for a Grammy for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance and has become a signature song for Englishwoman Dido Armstrong.  It was much bigger in the rest of the world, going to #1 or #2 in many countries.  Critics loved it, writing of Dido’s “sweet delivery,” calling it “comfort food for the ears,” and “the definition of ‘wistful’ in a song.”  The album it was from, Life for Real, sold a million copies in only five days and more than five million overall.

183
“Mississippi Queen”
Mountain
1970
Peak:   #21
The group was known for this one song, and it didn’t even get to the top half of the Top 40.  But it’s become an iconic number for Felix Pappalardi and his bandmates.  He insisted on repeated takes while recording the song, and drummer Corky Laing got tired of it.  So he began to use a cowbell as a lead-in.  Pappalardi loved it and left it in, thus creating the classic and distinctive intro.  The most famous use of a cowbell in a pop song ever?”

182
“Just Once”
Quincy Jones feat. James Ingram
1981
Peak:   #17
Ingram sang it.  My girlfriend at the time had a freakish elbow that hyperextended well beyond 180º when she’d lie on her side and prop her head up.  I used to kid her that I heard the line, “I think my all may have been too much” as “I think my arm may have bent too much.”  Haven’t seen her or talked to her in years, but I’ll bet she remembers!

181
“Bell Bottom Blues”
Eric Clapton
1973
Peak:   #78
This song made it to the nether regions of the Billboard Hot 100 twice, two years apart  – February of 1971 and March of 1973.  It reached #91 the first time, taken from the album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs and credited to Derek and the Dominoes.  The latter release was the exact same recording but credited to Eric Clapton, who was the principal songwriter.  The song was written for Pattie Boyd, the then-wife of Clapton’s good friend George Harrison.  She had asked Clapton to purchase a pair of bell bottom jeans when he went to the United States.  Clapton had a thing for Boyd and would later marry her, though he was clearly agonizing over his feelings for her at the time.

180
“You’re an Ocean”
Fastball
2000
Peak:   Did not chart!
Billy Ocean played piano for it.  Like their earlier hits this number was melodic in nature and had that feel-good quality to it.  Despite the release of three more albums, Fastball pretty much faded from view after this song.

179
“If Not for You”
Olivia Newton-John
1971
Peak:   #25
Written by Bob Dylan.  Covered by George Harrison on his album All Things Must Pass.
But it took this lovely lady to make it a hit  –  her first.  Interestingly, she didn’t like the song and recorded it reluctantly.  When she went into the studio, she had never even heard Dylan’s original, just Harrison’s cover!

178
“Just Like a Woman”
Bob Dylan
1966
Peak:   #33
Edie Sedgwick?  Joan Baez?   A critic:  “Everyone can understand the feeling and the relationship described in the song, so why does it matter if Dylan wrote it with one woman in mind?”  Dylan was accused of being misogynistic, as the title strongly implies, as does the line from the chorus:  “You break just like a little girl.”  To me the song is not about a man dissing a woman, but rather a man experiencing a female who is both woman and girl at once.  And that’s not sexist.

177
“Man!  I Feel Like a Woman!”
Shania Twain
1999
Peak:   #23
The world’s best-selling female country artist crossed over to pop and made the Top 40 with this sassy celebration of woman power; Twain won a Grammy in the category “Best Female Country Vocal Performance.”  A music critic said the song incorporates “a hook that sells like ice cream in the summer.”  Twain co-wrote the song with her husband at the time, famed record producer “Mutt” Lange.  She says, “I love to write stories; songwriting is my favorite part of what I do.  I like to give every song its own personality and attitude.”

176
“The Seduction”
James Last Band
1980
Peak:   #28
I generally don’t care for instrumentals, but this Giorgio Moroder composition is a good one, featuring mellow sax on the melody.  “The Seduction” was the love theme in the movie American Gigilo.  James Last was a German big band leader.  He sold more than 100 million albums  (Some sources suggest 200 million) and played 90 times at Royal Albert Hall in London.  Only Eric Clapton has graced the stage there more often. Last was an entertainer for almost 50 years, and he died at the age of 86 only six weeks after ending his final tour.  So he lived until he died.

175
“Fly Little White Dove Fly”
The Bells
1970-1971
Peak:   #95
Canadian band’s plea for peace had a catchy tune, which was a necessity because it was one of the most repetitive songs ever.  The chorus  –  “Fly, little white dove, fly,  way up high, spread your wings, sing out your cry across the universal sky” is repeated more than a dozen times after the three verses have been delivered.  Almost three and a half minutes with nothing but the chorus!

174
“First Time”
Lifehouse
2007
Peak:   #26
We’ll hear later from Jude Cole (See #8), who produced but first co-wrote this song with Lifehouse lead singer Jason Wade.  Wade felt some urgency to write the beginning-of-romance power pop song and gave it much thought.  The loving couples in the video of this upbeat, perfect-for-radio track are real, not actors.  Definitely a tune that should have done way better on the charts.

173
“Let Your Love Go”
Bread
1971
Peak:   #28
Bread was on their way toward notoriety as an acclaimed “soft rock” group, which was both complimentary and damning.  It made “Let Your Love Go” a considerable departure for David Gates and his comrades, as most Bread songs were paragons of sentimentality.  This Gates-penned number was closer to being a rocker.  I took my girlfriend at the time (not the one mentioned in #182) to see Bread in concert at Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls on her 18th birthday in 1977.   I must admit I don’t remember for sure that they played this song, but the smart money says they did!

172
“What I Like About You”
The Romantics
1980
Peak:   #49
That’s right:  What has become one of the most recognized anthems in all of rock music didn’t even make the Top 40!  Toward the end of the decade, the song served as commercial fodder for the popular beer Budweiser; this provided the song its boost to classic status.

171
“Memory”
Barry Manilow
1983
Peak:   #39
This show tune from the 1981 musical Cats  was later recorded by Barry Manilow, who knew how to sing a song  –  his own and others.  Manilow had 25 Top 40 hits but only two of them were more recent than this one.

170
“Do Right”
Paul Davis
1980
Peak:   #23
The opening line, “I know that He gave His life for me,” has Christianity at its heart and sets the tone for the rest of the song.  A number of listeners 37 years ago missed the gospelly message he intended.  Catchy and uplifting chorus even if the words didn’t put their stamp on your consciousness.

169

“The Homecoming”
Hagood Hardy
1976
Peak:   #41
There are only three instrumentals in this survey; the others are #210 and #176.   So this is the last one, but it’s a good one.  Comments from You Tube:  ” Some of the best music you will ever hear”…”Stirring instrumental”…”This guy must have had a beautiful heart to make such music”…”This is one of the few instrumentals to stand the test of time”…”This song somehow reaches my soul.”   Three years before it became a single the tune provided the music for a Salada tea commercial on television in 1972.  Hardy was a composer, arranger, vibraphonist and pianist, but “The Homecoming” is what he’ll be remembered for.

168

“This Afternoon”
Nickelback
2010
Peak:   #34
There’s a country music tinge to this rocker, and it plays well.  Topic:  Chilling with friends, smoking marijuana, drinking beer till you fall over, partying in the afternoon and continuing through the night.   An infectious number from Chad Kroeger and his band.   In the video a geek fraternity throws a party to prove they can rock.  Nickelback has been kidnapped and forced to perform.  Women in bikinis all over the place.

167

“Kiss Of Life”
Sade
1993
Peak:   #70
Sade (pronounced “Shar-day”) was born in Nigeria, raised in England from the time she was four years old.  She possesses a sultry, beautiful voice.  Arguably the greatest British female soloist ever, although Dusty Springfield springs to mind.  Sade has had eight singles  –  two of which were Top 10  –  chart higher than “Kiss of Life,” but this number’s smooth elegance makes it worthy of a Top 40, if not Top 10, place.  Like most of her songs, the pure allure here reaches your innermost being when you sit peacefully and listen.  Perhaps a less-than-great song, but everything Sade touches oozes sophistication and class out the pores!

166
“River”
Sarah MacLaughlan
2006 – 2007
Peak:   #26
It has come to be a Christmas song even though it’s not really about Christmas; Christmas is just the setting for this Joni Mitchell-penned song about mistreating and losing a lover.  Mitchell has recorded over 400 songs and this has been the second-most covered number of them all, trailing only the iconic “Both Sides Now.”  McLaughlin’s version of “River” is achingly beautiful, although I personally prefer Barry Manilow’s, which never charted.  The song briefly samples “Jingle Bells.”

165
“Counting Blue Cars”
Dishwalla
1996
Peak:   #15
Alternative rockers Dishwalla may have been a one-hit wonder, but this is a great song.  Mull over the controversial line, “Tell me all your thoughts on God, ’cause I’d really like to meet her.”  Some say the qualities we attribute to God are more befitting of a woman than a man.  Others believe God has no gender.  Anyway, despite peaking short of the Top 10, “Counting Blue Cars” was on the Hot 100 for four weeks shy of a whole year!  It was one of the longest runs for a one-hit wonder ever.


164

“You Look Good”
Lady Antebellum
2017
Peak:   #59

This is the first single released by the predominantly country group since 2014.  Though a country song at heart, “You Look Good” has an eclectic feel to it with hints of soul and even jazz.  For the first time a Lady Antebellum song includes horns, as the band wants to be more innovative than they’ve been.  I would think they’re at least a little disappointed that this song didn’t cross over into pop with greater impact.

163
“My Boy”
Elvis Presley
1975
Peak:   #20
John Lennon once said, “Before Elvis there was nothing.”  Best voice ever.  This was one of his last Top 40 hits before his death in August of 1977, though he had a few after his passing.  “My Boy” targets the heartstrings, as the narrator makes the painful decision to stay in a hopelessly rocky marriage because of his great love for his son.

162
“I.G.Y. (What a Beautiful World)”
Donald Fagen
1982
Peak:   #26
It stands for International Geophysical Year, which was a collaboration of world scientists in the late 1950s.  Steely Dan vet Fagen put himself back there to write this song from that perspective, foreseeing travel by undersea rail in an hour and a half and ubiquitous spandex jackets, among other things.  “I.G.Y.” was Fagen’s only Top 40 hit as a solo artist and earned a Grammy nomination for Song of the Year.  And there’s no shame in losing to Willie Nelson’s “Always on My Mind.”

161
“Pride and Joy”
Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble
1983
Peak:   Did not chart!
As is the case with several other tunes in this compilation, perhaps the failure to chart is partially due to the marketing, which did not directly target the Top 40 listener.  Vaughan wrote the song himself about a new girlfriend.  With the passing of time it has become one of his best known numbers.

160
“Rebel Yell”
Billy Idol
1984
Peak:   #46
Here’s a relentless rocker in which Idol sings about a girl who can’t get enough sex.  How could such an undertaking be anything but a gargantuan hit?  And I’m not the only one who thought so:  Late in 2008 ,VH1 named it the 29th-best hard rock song ever!

159
“Standing Still”
Jewel
2002
Peak:   #25
About her career in the music industry not progressing as she’d like.   At the time “Standing Still” came out it had been more than three years since Jewel had had a Top 40 hit.  Unfortunately she’s only had one since. “Standing Still” was also about said career bringing her love life to a standstill.  This was the first Jewel single that was the same as the album recording; previously the arrangements always differed.  

158
“Taken In”
Mike + The Mechanics
1986
Peak:   #32
Mike is Mike Rutherford, the guitarist for Genesis.  He formed this group on the side.  Great lyrics here:  “Taken in again.  Someone saw me coming  –  a fool without a friend.  There’s one born every minute, and you’re looking at him.”  The group had three Top 10 singles, but this one could’ve and should’ve been right there with them.

157
“The Real Thing”
Bo Bice
2006
Peak:   #56
Bo Bice was the runner-up to Carrie Underwood on American Idol in 2005.  That final decision appears to be the correct one, at least based on chart performance since then.  Bice has had one Top 40 and two singles in the Hot 100; Underwood has placed 18 songs in the Top 40 and 28 in the Hot 100.  Chart success isn’t the be all and end all, but it’s not even close.  In “The Real Thing” he repeatedly wonders if the love he feels is genuine.  Many of us have been there, done that.

156
“Better Now”
Collective Soul
2005
Peak:   Did not chart!
As teenagers used to say on American Bandstand  when interviewed by host Dick Clark, “It’s got a good beat and you can dance to it.”  The song ends with a sax solo  – or a guitar solo on radio edits, perhaps because they found the sax too jazzy in a Collective Soul record.  And in concert it’s a guitar.  I’d, of course, prefer the saxophone.  Kellogg’s has used the song in a commercial for Special K; a woman is “feeling better now” that she’s on a diet featuring the popular breakfast cereal.

155
“Everyday With You Girl
The Classics IV featuring Dennis Yost
1969
Peak:   #19
Lead singer Yost and his band were from Jacksonville, Florida, and brought the softer side of southern rock into the limelight with three mega-hits in the late ’60s:  “Spooky,” “Stormy” and “Traces.”  If they had  fourth song for which they were known, this was it.  Yost had a perfect voice for pop success.  “Everyday With You Girl” is closely based on the 1936 song “Everyday With Jesus.”

154
“Painted Ladies”
Ian Thomas
1973 – 1974
Peak:   #34
This was his first single and his only hit.  Since then, as a solo artist and a member of two different groups, he has released more than 35 singles and nary a one of them has made the Billboard Hot 100.  “Painted Ladies” are actually colorfully-painted Victorian houses in San Francisco.  The city is not mentioned in the song, but the phrase “streetcars rolling by” affirms what the song is about:  The singer walks the streets of The City by the Bay and is ignored, spends his money, hangs out in his room, dreams of home, and drinks wine till he’s wasted.

153
” Just a Girl”
No Doubt
1996
Peak:   #23
This was No Doubt’s first of seven Top 40 hits, and it came more than four years before any of the others.  Gwen Stefani composed the tune and recalls, “I just literally started songwriting; I didn’t even know that I knew how to song write,” and “I just wanted to write a song to express how I was feeling in that moment and I never in my wildest dreams thought that anyone would hear it.”

152
“Hearts on Fire”
Randy Meisner
1981
Peak:   #19
Briefly a member of Poco in the early days and later a founding member of the Eagles, Meisner managed three Top 40 hits as a soloist.  This was his best one.  In March of 2016 his wife called 9-1-1 to report her husband was drunk and waving a BB gun around.  Police investigated, saw no weapons, and concluded it was a typical domestic altercation.  An hour and a half later Meisner’s wife was killed accidentally when a rifle discharged in its case.  Why was she after a rifle?  We’ll never know.  Meisner was not suspected of wrongdoing, as surveillance video confirmed he was elsewhere in the house.

151
“What a Wonderful World”
Louis Armstrong
1988
Peak:   #32
When released in 1967 the song was not popular in the United States because the head honcho at ABC Records didn’t like it and didn’t promote it.   However, in 1988 it appeared in the movie Good Morning, Vietnam and was released again, achieving the ranking shown here.  Should’ve been as big in our country as it was elsewhere.  “What a Wonderful World” was the best-selling 45 in Britain in 1968 and was a #1 song in Australia in 1988  –   20 years later.  Since the turn of the century the song has been in at least a dozen movies.  Talk about standing the test of time!

150
“My Best Friend’s Girl

The Cars
1978
Peak:   #35                                                                                                                                       Like virtually all the hits from this band,  composed by lead singer Ric Ocasek.   It was one of the first songs Kurt Cobain learned to play when his dad got him a guitar for his 14th birthday.  It was later performed by Cobain’s band Nirvana at their final concert on March 1, 1994.  Ocasek has been married to model Paulina Porizkova since 1989, at which time it was no longer necessary to be jealous of his best friend!                            

149
“Leave a Tender Moment Alone”
Billy Joel
1984
Peak:   #27
His album An Innocent Man produced six singles; this is the only one of them that didn’t make the Top 20.  But it’s a good song.   Jazz musician Toots Thielemans plays the harmonica on the recording.  Joel wrote of the song, ” ‘Leave a Tender Moment Alone’ sounds like an old Motown track, like Eddie Kendricks of the Temptations and Smokey Robinson made them.  I tried to sing like those Motown guys and Toots was like an extra voice dancing happily around mine.  He really exudes some incredible energy and joie de vivre.” 

 148
“Wait for Me”
Hall & Oates
1979 – 1980
Peak:   #18
“Love is what it does and ours is doing nothing, but all the time we spent  –  It must be good for something.  Please forgive all the disturbance I’m creating, but you’ve got a lot to learn if you think that I’m not waiting for you.”  Written by Darryl Hall.  The rock era’s most successful duo had six #1 hits and “Wait for Me” was nearly as good, despite its relatively low chart peak.

147 
“For the First Time”
The Script
2011
Peak:   #23
“Even after all these years we just now got the feeling that we’re meeting for the first time.”  Band member and songwriter Danny O’Donaghue explains, “It’s all about going back to basics:  drinking cheap wine, eating your dinner off the floor.  That’s when you meet each other for the first time  –  when you have nothing.”

146
“Enter Sandman

Metallica
1991
Peak:   #16
Heavy metal’s most popular song and perhaps the greatest ever.  How could a genre’s

best-foot-forward fail to even reach the Top 10?  “Enter Sandman” garnered critical acclaim, as in “propulsive riff,” “never lets up,” and “psycho dramatic.”  The track is included in almost all listings of the greatest songs of all time.  Number 16 peak on Billboard?  Simply, pop prejudice against this kind of music. 

145
“Sharp Dressed Man”
ZZ Top
1983
Peak:   #56
In determining my opinion of a song the music is almost always more important than the words.  Strange thing for a poet to admit, but it’s true.  For ZZ Top the lyrics were nothing more than an excuse to play wicked guitar.  “That Little Ol’ Band From Texas” has arguably the fullest, most rhythmic, most distinctive sound in the business.  Who is not able to instantly recognize their music?  “Sharp Dressed Man” was one of their best.

144
“Six Man Band”
The Association
1968
Peak:   #47
“Well, I’m a California man, my instrument in hand, I’m electrified!  On a fast-flying trip, dirty laundry in my grip, mostly drip-dry.”  Those who dismissed The Association as a sunshine pop, harmonizing band that couldn’t really rock should lend an ear to this number with its cutting guitar riffs.  Question:  What performer(s) took the stage first at the legendary Monterey Pop Festival?   Answer:  The Association.

143
“Can We Still Be Friends”
Todd Rundgren
1978
Peak:   #29
It sounds like he had somebody in mind when he wrote the words, but he says not. Rundgren:  “It’s really a song about the best possible way to end a relationship.”   In theory, maybe.  But the older sister of my best friend said one of the wisest things I ever heard:  “The one who controls the relationship is the one who cares the least.”  And that’s why friendship usually doesn’t work after a breakup:  It hurts too much for the one who cares more.  Despite his denial of the song being about a specific person, it is believed to be about the end of his liaison with long-time girlfriend Bebe Buell, who was Playboy‘s Playmate of the Month in November of 1974.  Throughout much of the 1970s she had an open relationship with Rundgren and took full advantage by indulging her thing for rock musicians.  Her list included David Bowie, Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones, Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin and Steven Tyler of Aerosmith.

142
“(I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone”
The Monkees
1966 – 1967
Peak:   #20
The television Monkees were Davy Jones, Mickey Dolenz, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork, but only Dolenz was actually on the recording of this song!  He sang lead.  The backing vocal was sung by Tommy Boyce, who co-wrote the song with Bobby Hart, as was the case with most Monkees songs.  Hart played organ, but there were six other little-known musicians.  The song was originally recorded by Paul Revere & The Raiders and has been covered extensively, including versions by the Sex Pistols and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

141
“Long Long Time”
Linda Ronstadt
1970
Peak:   #25
Ronstadt was nominated for a Grammy in the category Best Contemporary Female Vocal Performance for this number, which was her first solo hit.  She didn’t write the song but embraced it sang it with heartfelt emotion as though she had.   Ronstandt’s band at the time included two guys who would go on to be key members of a pretty popular group.  Who were they?  Glenn Frey and Don Henley of the Eagles.  She was also close with Jackson Browne.  Sadly, Ronstadt has Parkinson’s and can no longer sing.

140
“We Gotta Go Home”
Music Explosion
1967
Peak:   Did not chart!
The bubblegum garage band from Mansfield, Ohio, had only one Top 10 hit  –  and this wasn’t it, of course.  (“Little Bit O’ Soul” was.)  Only about two minutes long, “We Gotta Go Home” just missed the Billboard Hot 100.  I’m sure not too many people own the single, but I do.  You could procure a copy on eBay, but how would you play it?

139
“I Melt With You”
Modern English
1990
Peak:   #76
The topic?   Intercourse with nuclear bombs falling.  So, the melting is literal!  But this tune is new wave at its best and made the group a modest one-hit wonder.  The song had charted at #78 in 1983, then it was re-recorded and re-released in 1990, when it did only marginally better.  Funny thing, though:  A lot of songs that peaked in the bottom ¼ of the Hot 100 you’ve never heard of.  But I’ll bet you know this one.

138
“You Can Call Me Al”
Paul Simon
1987
Peak:   #23
In the fall of 1986 this song stalled short of the Top 40, then fell off the Hot 100.  In February of 1987 the album from which the song came, Graceland, won a Grammy for Album of the Year.  This rejuvenated “You Can Call Me Al,” which re-entered the charts. It also got a big lift from its spontaneity-driven, humorous video with Simon playing straight man to comedian Chevy Chase, who lip-synched, periodically gestured and “danced”  in his chair like a dork, and pretended to play a trombone.

137
“Heartbreaker”
Pat Benatar
1979 – 1980
Peak:   #23
Benatar’s first hit.  She would have nine singles go higher, but only three were on the chart longer.  Two singles from her debut album were released before this one but went nowhere; “Heartbreaker” put her on the map.  VH1 declared the song to be the 72nd-greatest rock song of all time, and it’s one of Benatar’s favorites.

136
“Keep the Fire”
Kenny Loggins
1980
Peak:   #36
I’m not the only one who thought this song was better than its chart peak would suggest.   Here are comments I found courtesy of You Tube:  “Should’ve charted much higher!  Very underrated song.”  “Awesome song.  Remember this from the spring of 1980.  Too bad it didn’t chart higher.”  “Truly an underrated song.  The last minute is awesome.”  “This is an underrated song, indeed.”  “What a classic!”

135
“Shut Up and Kiss Me”
Mary Chapin Carpenter
1994
Peak:   #90
A country song that earned its way onto the pop charts via its lack of the typical country twang.  Trisha Yearwood on background vocal.  Carpenter won a Grammy for Best Female Country Vocal Performance.  Carpenter these days has turned to softer, make-you-think stuff, which is okay in a way but also too bad because this song was a genuine mid-tempo rocker.  Her whispering of the song’s title in the chorus is an added touch.

134
“No Night So Long”
Dionne Warwick
1980
Peak:   #23
Warwick topped the adult contemporary chart for three straight weeks with this song. 
She has had more than 50 singles in the Billboard Hot 100, starting in 1962.  During her career she won five Grammy Awards and was nominated nine other times.  For four years in the 1970s she added an “e” to the end of her last name on the advice of an astrologer.  She now regards doing so a mistake.  Well, like the song says, “I still can show you who you are.”

133
“Breathless”
The Corrs
2001
Peak:   #34
The Coors were from Ireland and “Breathless” was their only Top 40 American hit.  It was bigger elsewhere in the world and would be nominated for a Grammy Award.  Reviews were mixed.  It’s pop, it’s rock, it’s a bit too sweet, it’s a woman who wants to lose herself in her boundless, uncontrollable passion.  So she keeps egging him on.

132
“So You Are a Star”
The Hudson Brothers
1974
Peak:   #21
These were three actual brothers, and they wrote this, but it was hurt by the fact they had a Saturday morning kids’ TV show, as people perceived them to be like the Monkees and assumed they didn’t write their own songs or play their own instruments.  Mark Hudson was later the bandleader for Joan Rivers’ talk show.  Bill Hudson married Goldie Hawn in 1976, fathered Oliver and Kate Hudson with her, and bitterly divorced her in 1981.  He also dated Ali MacGraw and Candice Bergen, and was married to Cindy Williams of Laverne and Shirley.   Looks like he had a thing for actresses.  Like the song says, “So you are a star.  Okay.  Nobody knows you like I do.”

131
“Son of My Father”
Giorgio
1972
Peak:   #46
Anybody up for a synthesizer war?  In the United Kingdom, Giorgio Moroder, the principal songwriter, failed to chart, while Chicory Tip’s version went to #1.  In the United States Chicory’s version barely made the Hot 100, while Giorgio’s went much higher.  Go figure.  I’m usually glad when the person who wrote the song does better on the charts than those who cover it.  I must admit, though, that my 45 is by Chicory (as they were known in this country), which means Northeast Ohio music stores were selling that version.  Truth be told, there’s little difference.  Here’s one, though:  Chicory’s version starts, “Mama said to me…” while Giorgio’s begins with, “Father said to me…”

130
“All Along the Watchtower”
The Jimi Hendrix Experience
1968
Peak:   #20
To say that Jimi Hendrix was way ahead of his time is to understate the obvious.  Few cared less about hit 45s than he did.   His highest-charting single was this outstanding interpretation of Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower.”  Talk about making a song your own!  “Two riders were approaching, and the wind began to howl” and the guitar riff that follows is to die for.   What did Dylan think of the Hendrix version?  “It overwhelmed me, really.  He had such talent; he could find things inside a song and vigorously develop them.  He found things that other people wouldn’t think of finding in there.  He probably improved upon it…”  The Hendrix rendition was named one of the 50 greatest songs of all time by Rolling Stone magazine.

129
“Paradise by the Dashboard Light”
Meat Loaf
1978
Peak:   #39
Shall we vote on the best-known song that didn’t make a lot of noise on the singles chart?  This was really not so much a song as an anthem for young lust and the ultimate ramifications thereof.  Eight minutes of what at the time was dubbed a “novelty” record.  The guy who played bass on it admitted, “Through the whole process I remember distinctly saying to myself, ‘This is just the biggest joke that I’ve ever been involved in.  I cannot believe that these people got a record deal!  This is just crazy.  I’ll never hear this record.  It’s just a joke.  It’s a comedy record.’ ”  The album the song came from, Bat Out of Hell,” sold 40 million copies worldwide and is one of the 10 best-selling albums ever.  And that’s no joke.

128
“Misled”
Celine Dion
1994
Peak:   #23
Celine sounds so much like Janet Jackson here that it must be intentional.  Not a bad strategy, really, because Jackson was topping the charts repeatedly at the time.  Reviewers recognized that this single was a departure for the five-time Grammy winner and therefore a career highlight.  Dion sings in eight different languages but mostly English and French.

127
“In the Shape of a Heart”
Jackson Browne
1986
Peak:   #70
Jackson Browne songs are generally poems put to music, and this number is no exception.  He has said it’s about his first wife, who 10 years earlier had committed suicide by intentionally overdosing on barbiturates.  One of the best songs about tragic love ever.  The lyrics are fantastic.  Every time  I listen to them or read them, I’m like, “Wow!”  “In the shape of a heart” can be taken literally, as in, “the form of the pendant,” or figuratively, as in, “the condition of the heart.”  (Consider “It was a time I won’t forget for the sorrow and regret, and the shape of a heart.”)  Nowhere near the Top 40?  A lot of people never sat down and really listened to the words.

 

Okay.  We’re halfway through.  Theoretically the better music is ready to leave the on deck circle and step up to the plate.  Hmm.  Is there a baseball song in the offing?

For now, for “intermission,”  we offer…

Jackson Browne’s
“In the Shape of a Heart”

It was a ruby that she wore
On a chain around her neck
In the shape of a heart,
In the shape of a heart.
It was a time I won’t forget
For the sorrow and regret
And the shape of a heart, 
And the shape of a heart.
I guess I never knew
What she was talking about;
I guess I never knew
What she was living without.
People speak of love,
Don’t know what they’re thinking of.
Wait around for the one who fits just like a glove.
Speak in terms of belief and belonging,
Try to fit some name to their longing…
There was a hole left in the wall
From some ancient fight –
About the size of a fist
Or something thrown that had missed.
And there were other holes as well
In the house where our nights fell.
Far too many to repair
In the time that we were there.
People speak of love,
Don’t know what they’re thinking of.
Reach out to each other through the push and shove.
Speak in terms of a life and the learning
And try to think of a word for the burning.
You keep it up;
You try so hard
To keep a life from coming apart
And never know
What breaches and faults are concealed
In the shape of a heart,
In the shape of a heart,
In the shape of a heart…
It was the ruby that she wore
On a stand beside the bed
In the hour before dawn
When I knew she was gone.
And I held it in my hand
For a little while
And dropped it into the wall;
I let it go and heard it fall.
I…
I guess I never knew
What she was talking about;
I guess I never knew
What she was living without.
People speak of love,
Don’t know what they’re thinking of.
Wait around for the one who fits just like a glove.
Speak in terms of a life and the living
And try to find the word for forgiving.
Oh, you keep it up;
You try so hard
To keep a life from coming apart
And never know
The shallows and the unseen reefs
That are there from the start
In the shape of a heart,
In the shape of a heart,
In the shape of a heart,
In the shape of a heart
In the shape of a heart…

 

126
“Brave”
Sara Bareilles
2014
Peak:   #23
A song about being courageous enough to come out of the closet, especially to one’s family.  It was meant to be an anthem of empowerment for suicidal LGBT teenagers in particular.  The song was co-written by Bareilles and the band fun.’s Jack Antonoff.   Bareilles wasn’t shy (Rather she was brave!) about wanting radio stations to play the song, which would garner a Grammy nomination for Best Pop Solo Performance.

125
“Change of Heart”
Eric Carmen
1978
Peak:   #19
Between his work with the Raspberries, for whom he was the driving force, and his subsequent solo career, Eric Carmen had 12 Top 40 hits.  This was one of them.  “I understand all the reasons you gave me for leavin’, but that doesn’t help when I’m sleepin’ alone each night.  Aw, so if you ever have a change of heart, just remember it’s not too late to start.”

124
“Lucky Man”
Emerson, Lake & Palmer
1971
Peak:   #48
The first song Greg Lake ever wrote.  He was 12 years old and later described it as having a “medieval tone.”  One of the earliest rock songs to feature a solo on a Moog synthesizer, which took Keith Emerson only one take to record.  “Lucky Man” charted again in 1973 upon re-release.  Emerson:  “It is a shame we really can’t perform it the way it is on the album.”

123
“I Drink Alone”
George Thorogood & the Destroyers
1985
Peak:   Did not chart!
In case it has not been made clear, let me say I’m partial to the saxophone in rock songs.  It’s prominently featured in this tune, as is great guitar work by Thorogood.  Never made the Hot 100 only because it wasn’t marketed to.  Video glorifies debauchery but has an unlikely ending that is nonetheless consistent with the theme of the song.

122
“Hold On Loosely”
.38 Special
1981
Peak:   #27 
One of the songwriters here was Jim Peterik of Survivor.  He’s been married over 30 years and says of his wife, “This is what broke us apart when we were teenagers:  I was getting too close.  I was getting too serious for her.  She didn’t say, ‘Hold on loosely,’ but that’s what was in her heart.”  The advice in the lyrics goes a bit beyond Peterik’s experience to a universality:  “It’s so damn easy when your feelings are such, to overprotect her, to love her too much.  And my mind goes back to a girl I left long years ago who told me, ‘Just hold on loosely, but don’t let go.  If you cling too tightly, you’re gonna lose control.’  “

121
“Today”
The New Christy Minstrels
1964
Peak:   #17
To many in the early 1960s the New Christy Minstrels WERE folk music.  Over 300 people have been members of the group; the typical lineup consisted of double figures in voices.  One-time members include the Golden Globe award-winning actress Karen Black and individual recording artists Kim Carnes, Barry McGuire (“Eve of Destruction”) and Kenny Rogers.  “Today” was their second-highest charting hit.

120
“Tell Me What You Dream”
Restless Heart
1993
Peak:   #43
Wanna grab my attention from the get-go?  Open with saxophone!  Timothy B. Schmitt, whose group the Eagles had broken up at the time, was one of three songwriters.  “Tell Me What You Dream” inexplicably failed to reach the Top 40 on either the pop chart or the country chart, and yet it was a #1 hit on the adult contemporary chart!  How yucky when your lover is talking in her sleep  –  and it’s not your name you hear!  Officially this was “Restless Heart with Warren Hill,” the saxophonist.  He and Restless Heart were on the same record label, RCA, and they were giving him exposure in hopes that he would be the next Kenny G.  How’d that work out?

119
“Does Your Mother Know”
Abba
1979
Peak:   #19 
Usually the Swedish pop group let their female members do the vocals, but not on this one.  Appropriate because it speaks of a man’s response to the flirtations of a much younger woman  –  probably an underage girl whose mother likely is not aware that her daughter is very much out and about.  Co-songwriter Bjorn Ulvaeus did the singing on a number that melodically blended rock and dance music.  And, by the way, the narrator enjoys the encounter but resists the charms of the youthful temptress.

118
“Shilo”
Neil Diamond
1970
Peak:   #24
Because Diamond had experienced a lonely and troubled childhood, this song about a youngster who conjures up an imaginary friend can be considered autobiographical.
Throughout his career the singer would have more than 25 songs that made a bigger splash upon release than this one did, but “Shilo” became one of his most recognizable songs, was performed regularly in concert, and appeared on many of his compilation albums.

 

117
“On the Road Again”
Willie Nelson
1980
Peak:   #20
Won a Grammy for Best Country Song.  Nelson was asked to write the theme song for the movie Honeysuckle Rose.  He and the executive producer of the film were on a flight at the time, and Nelson wrote the song on a barf bag!   It was used in a television ad in 2016 for Volkswagen Passat.  A family’s driving on the highway when Willie Nelson, in a VW beetle convertible from years gone by, beeps as he passes them.  The male driver expresses his astonishment to his wife.

116
“Come Back to Me”
David Cook
2009
Peak:   #63
David Cook won the seventh season of American Idol.  A music critic on this song:  “Cook gives an earnest, restrained vocal performance, reflective of the pensive lyric about letting a loved one go so that person can grow.”  The song purportedly got a boost from radio airplay and digital downloads after his performance of the song on the aforementioned singing competition TV show.

115
“Change”
Lisa Stansfield
1991 – 1992
Peak:   #27
Most critics gave it positive reviews, and it charted higher in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Italy, New Zealand, Spain, Switzerland, and Stansfield’s native United Kingdom than it did here.  In six of those countries it was Top 10.  So why not in the U.S.A.?  Other musical interests, I suppose.  Glam metal was still hanging on and hip- hop was gaining steam.  But I much prefer music like this.  I love the sassy sax!

114
“Ever the Same”
Rob Thomas
2006
Peak:   #48
The sound here is reminiscent of the 1980s, and that’s not a bad thing.  It was written by Thomas for his wife as she fought a serious and unidentifiable illness.  It’s a promise to always be there for her, no matter what.  He wrote it one night after she cried herself to sleep in his arms.  Key line:  “Just let me hold you while you’re falling apart.”  In September of 2015 Marisol Maldonado  –  wife of Rob Thomas  –  had brain surgery to remove a lesion.  She has a form of Lyme disease but has been coping, as has her husband.

113
“Toast and Marmalade for Tea”
Tin Tin
1971
Peak:   #20
Oldies radio stations don’t play it much anymore, but there are critics who feel it’s one of the best singles by a one-hit wonder.  “Toast and Marmalade for Tea” gradually builds momentum with its slow start supplemented by strings and brass as the song progresses.  Lyrically simple and repetitive.  Produced by Maurice Gibb of the Bee Gees, who also played on the record, and proudly reminiscent of Bee Gees harmony.  But, to the extent the song is remembered at all, there were two defining features:  1) It was unique because it had no chorus, just verses.  2) It had distinctive piano distortion.  And both features were happenstance.  They had intended to write a chorus but ran out of time and had to go with what they had, and the distortion was at first an accident caused by a sound engineer leaning on a tape machine!

112
“Put Your Records On”
Corrine Bailey Rae
2006
Peak:   #64
Rae is English, and the song reached #2 in her native land.  She was nominated for Grammy Awards for both Song of the Year, which goes to the composer, and Record of the Year, which goes to the performer.  In addition to a bravura performance, Rae was one of the songwriters.

111
“I Do”
Colbie Caillat
2011
Peak:   #23
Upbeat, breezy, fun and pure pop, to a fault.   Is the “I do” what one says in marriage vows?  Caillat (pronounced “Cal-LAY”) claims not, even though it’s clearly a song about wanting to make the object of your love your lifetime partner.  Caillat:  “If you listen to the end, I say, ‘I do love you,’ and it’s about getting ready to tell that person you’re in love with them.”  But she does add, “Songs are for people to take however they want and relate them to whatever is going on in their own lives.  So if someone wants to have it at their wedding, I think that’s cool if they want my song to be a part of their day.”  Critics:  “Uncomplicated sound,” “massive hook,” “You buy the hocus pocus without regret”, “almost delirious love expressed,” and “a winner hands down.”  She’s had bigger hits, but few better songs.

110
“Taxi”
Harry Chapin
1972
Peak:  #24
Few songwriters could tell a story like Harry Chapin.  In this one the narrator had wanted to “learn to fly,” which is somewhat autobiographical because Chapin was briefly enrolled at the Air Force Academy.  He said the song overall is “about 60% true.”  It’s set in San Francisco, though Chapin had driven a cab in New York, where he was tragically killed nine years after “Taxi” in an automobile accident.  The official cause of death was a heart attack, but it was never determined if that had occurred before or after the accident.  The philanthropically-inclined Chapin was on his way to perform at a free concert that night.

109
“One Less Set of Footsteps”
Jim Croce
1973
Peak:   #37
Croce (pronounced “Crow-Chee”) tells a former lover to kiss off in a lyrical treasure.  This song would have been bigger had it not been overshadowed by the release of mega-smash “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” only months later.  Croce was on his way to big things before he and his guitarist Maury Muehleisen were killed in a pilot-error plane crash on September 20th of the same year.  I was mere weeks into my first year of college but remember well who told me about the fatal accident and where I was at the time I heard.

108
“Crazy on You”
Heart
1976
Peak:   #35
The record company, it seems, had trouble believing this wasn’t a bigger hit at the time, as it released it again just a year after its peak.  And it charted again, this time topping out at #62.   “Crazy on You” would go on to become one of the the group’s best-known and most-beloved songs.   It still gets played on classic rock stations.   Heart performed the song at their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2013; the original lineup hadn’t played together in more than 30 years.

107
“Restless Heart”
Peter Cetera
1992
Peak:   #35
Cetera co-wrote this song, which was his fifth and final one to reach the top spot on the adult contemporary chart.  He had seven songs that charted in the Billboard Hot 100 after he left the group Chicago in 1995 because they were unwilling to allow him to stay while he worked on a solo career.  He had made to the group a proposal to do so, but the rest of the guys wouldn’t go for it.  Chicago would have 12 songs chart after Cetera departed, compared to the ridiculous total of 35 while he was a member of the band.

106
“Honey Do”
The Strangeloves
1968
Peak:   Did not chart!
An upbeat, feel-good song that couldn’t cut it nationally, though it was big in parts of California and in New York City.  Plus, I lived in Ohio and must’ve heard the song enough to be enticed into buying the single.  The Strangeloves operated under the pretense of being Australian sheep farmers who came up with a new way to crossbreed sheep, making enough money to form a band.  They were supposedly brothers by the names of Giles, Miles, and Niles Strange.   Complete fiction!  But they had three Top 40 hits in the mid-Sixties, the biggest of which was “I Want Candy.”

105
“My Favorite Mistake”
Sheryl Crow
1998
Peak:   #20
Is this a quintessential anthem for anyone who fell in love when they shouldn’t have?  The song was co-written by Crow and is about an unfaithful man, possibly Eric Clapton or Bob Dylan’s son Jakob.  Crow won’t say who it’s about and delights in the fact that “I’m the only person who will ever actually know.”  She does deny it was Clapton and doesn’t look upon her relationship with him as a mistake at all.  She has referred to him as “a really good friend.”  Her song was nominated for a Grammy for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance, losing to Celine Dion’s “My Heart Will Go On” from the blockbuster motion picture Titanic.  But such hype aside, “My Favorite Mistake” was a better song.

104
“All Day Music”
War
1971
Peak:   #35
Harmonica intro.  Kick back and relax to a soothing, unique masterpiece.  War was a multi-ethnic group with a multi-genre sound, incorporating funk, jazz, reggae, R and B,
and rock.  More than 30 different musicians have been members of War through the years, starting in 1969.

103
“Sunrise”
Simply Red
2003
Peak:   Did not chart!
To say that the British band “sampled” the #1 hit “I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do)” by Hall & Oates is a gross understatement.  But even if this song is half original and half re-make, it still deserves a spot on this list.  The success of the song, such as it was, was partly attributable to its video of a sensual pool party, shot near Rio de Janeiro at a mansion designed by a famed Brazilian architect.

102
“Burnin’ for You”
Blue Oyster Cult
1981
Peak:   #40
Looking for a distinctive guitar sound?  Few groups were as recognizable for that as BOC.  This song was played a lot in the beginning days of MTV.   In fact it would not be much of a reach to suggest that the “Burnin’ for You” video was a major contributor to today’s popularity of the music video.   This one is unremarkable except that a presumed “dumpee” incinerates himself in a car.

101
“Holiday”
Green Day
2005
Peak:   #19
More popular song around the world than its peak in this country would suggest.  The National Hockey League’s Vancouver Canucks used to play it after a goal.   I generally don’t care for punk rock but I like this song.  In concert in New Jersey the band changed the lyric “Pulverize the Eiffel Tower” to “Pulverize the Donald Trump Towers.”  I prefer groups that don’t politicize.

100
“Changes”
David Bowie
1975 
Peak:   #41
At first even Bowie didn’t think much of this song, calling it a “throwaway.”  He never dreamed it would eventually become one of his best-known songs and withstand the test of time as it has.  The teen-driven American audience warmed to the song slowly.
It was released twice, in 1972 and 1975, charting in the 60s the first time.  But folks clamored for it in concert; youngsters related to the lyrics:  “Those children that you spit on as they try to change their worlds are immune to your consultations; they’re quite aware of what they’re going through.”  Bowie sings the title with a stutter  –  “Ch-ch-ch-changes.”  The only more famous stutter I can think of at the moment is Elton John’s “B-B-B-Bennie and the Jets.”

99
“Little Lion Man”
Mumford & Sons
2011
Peak:   #45
They play English folk rock.  This song peaked at #61 before a Grammy performance sent it back onto the Hot 100 at #45.  In Britian the “f word” is probably considered less vulgar and offensive than it is in this country, especially when used in the phrase “fuck up.”  According to Merriam-Webster it means “to ruin or spoil especially through stupidity or carelessness.”  Hence, Mumford & Sons chose the ideal words for the chorus in terms of getting their very personal meaning across:  “It was not your fault but mine, and it was your heart on the line.  I really fucked it up this time, didn’t I,  my dear?”  A respected linguist has written that to some people, “Metaphorical uses of the word fuck no more invoke images of sexual intercourse than a ten-year-old’s ‘My mom’ll kill me if she finds out’ evokes images of murder.”  This song belonged in the Top 10 for sure.

98
“Cry”
Godley & Creme
1985
Peak:   #16
Only Top 40 hit for this duo, although they had a few with 10cc before defecting, which they later regretted.  The accompanying video was one of the first to use the technology where one image morphs into another.  In this case it was human faces.  After their musical careers Godley & Creme directed videos for the Police and Duran Duran, among others.  They were considered innovators in this field of entertainment.

97
“It’s Over”
Boz Scaggs
1976
Peak:   #38
The sensational album Silk Degrees generated three Top 40 hits and a fourth that narrowly missed.  It spent more than two years on the Billboard 200.  The first single released was “It’s Over,” which means the decision-makers considered it the strongest song on the LP.  Years later a reviewer wrote that “It’s Over” could be an outtake from a Broadway musical.

96
“I’d Love to Change the World”
Ten Years After
1971
Peak:   #40
Though the song is more than 45 years old, its relevance hasn’t really diminished.  War continues, the rich get richer and the poor poorer, and we’re overpopulated and polluted more now than we were then.  The group started in 1966 and called themselves “Ten Years After” because they deemed rock and roll to have started in about 1956.  And how about these lyrics?  “Life is funny, skies are sunny, bees make honey, who needs money?  Monopoly©.”

95
“Lowdown”
Chicago
1971
Peak:   #35
Clearly the sound of that great band in the early going, with those horns and wah-wah guitar and Hammond organ.  Optimistic, almost cheerful music with discouraging, sad lyrics.  Speaking of lyrics, the group recorded and performed the song in Japanese for that market.  

94
“It Hurts To Be Sixteen”
Andrea Carroll
1963
Peak:   #45
I’ll start with an admission:  This tune is a little extra special to me because I coached (basketball) girls this age.  She was from Cleveland, Ohio.  She took “Carroll” as her stage name to honor Gene Carroll, on whose Cleveland-area television show she often sang as a child.  Appropriately, she was 16 years old when she recorded this, her only hit.  The Chiffons sang backing vocals for her, and they very much sound like themselves on the record.  As a teenager she toured with Elvis Presley, Stevie Wonder, and Bob Hope.  When her music career fizzled, she attended Kent State and ultimately earned a Ph.D. in clinical therapy.  She is also an acting coach in California.  Her married name is Andrea Hill.  Her book Making It In The Business:  Overcoming Obstacles And Achieving Your Goals In The Entertainment Industry  is for those wanting to go into entertainment.  (She did some acting too.)  Now 70 years old.  Of this song someone wrote on You Tube, “Never since have songwriters been able to capture the miseries of being a teenager in such a heartfelt clever way.  Today’s purveyors of chest-beating histrionics could take a lesson here.”  (The songwriting credit went to Ronnie Grossman, who was Neil Sedaka’s sister.  But he actually wrote the song and gave the royalties to her!)

93
“I’m Happy Just to Dance with You”
The Beatles
1964
Peak:   #95
From the soundtrack of A Hard Day’s Night, this was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney specifically for bandmate George Harrison to sing.  “A simple idea,” McCartney called the catchy number.  Why it never caught on in the Beatles-crazed mid-Sixties is beyond me.  A slowed-down cover by Anne Murray did reach #64 in 1980.

92
“Tiny Dancer”
Elton John
1972
Peak:   #41
Here’s a classic built as time passed.  Music by Elton John, lyrics by Bernie Taupin  –  as was the case with many Elton John songs.  Upon its initial release “Tiny Dancer” didn’t even make the Top 40, but it slowly gained recognition and eventually became one of the hit machine’s most popular songs.  Exquisitely-arranged strings complement the signature John piano.

91
“Shadows in the Moonlight
Anne Murray
1979
Peak:   #25
This was a #1 song on the Hot Country chart and the Adult Contemporary chart.  Murray’s music routinely succeeded as country and as pop.  She was a true crossover artist and a trailblazer for fellow Canadian female singers k.d. lang, Celine Dion and Shania Twain.  Murray has won four Grammy Awards and 24 Juno Awards, the latter of which is a record.  Junos are for musical artists in Canada.

90
“New Year’s Day”
U2
1983
Peak:   #53
This was the Irish rockers’ first hit outside their own country, their first tune to crack the Billboard Hot 100.  Seven years ago Rolling Stone magazine included it their list of the 500 greatest songs ever.  The topic here is the Polish Solidarity movement.  U2 was shocked when they performed the song in concert in Poland as fans waved red items in one section and as other sections waved white, thus creating the Polish flag.

89
“Close Your Eyes”
Edward Bear
1973
Peak:   #37
There are at least 21 Canadian recording artists on this list; here’s one of them.  Edward Bear’s biggest hit was called “Last Song.”  This number followed it and in fact mentioned it:  “See, you’d written one last song and I realize it’s mine.”  A lifelong friend of mine used to quote part of the chorus:  “Change your lovers, change your name.”  (He says it was me quoting it to him!)  How can something so sweet, so beautiful, so flowingly melodic be so underappreciated in the annals of pop music?

88
“Don’t Know Why”
Norah Jones
2003
Peak:   #30
One of the least-likely-sounding Top 40 hits ever.  A critical success that won three Grammy Awards, for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance and two major ones  –  Record of the Year and Song of the Year.  It’s Jones’ only Top 40 single.  Her father was Ravi Shankar, the sitar-playing close associate of Beatle George Harrison.

87
“Let’s Work Together”
Canned Heat
1970
Peak:   #26
If one were to compile a list of the best rock bands never to have a Top 10 single, these guys would have to make the list.  They were a bluesy group who took their name from a 1928 song called “Canned Heat Blues,” which was about a man who tried to beat alcoholism by instead drinking Sterno Canned Heat; the stuff is a poisonous cooking fuel today!  Canned Heat played at both the Monterey Pop Festival and Woodstock in the late Sixties.

86
“Next to Me”
Emeli Sandé
2012
Peak:   #25
Strong both musically and lyrically, this song was far superior to the crap that surrounded it on the charts.  Sandé:  “I wrote this in my bedroom.  I wanted a song that’s very simple in its idea  –  having someone next to you; that’s the bottom line.       I was inspired by early Aretha Franklin and soul music.”  Her hair style in the video certainly did the song no favors, but R & B lives on.

85
“Just Got Started Lovin’ You”
James Otto
2008
Peak:   #27
Country singer Otto was one of three writers for this one; it became his one and only hit to cross over onto the pop chart.  It was huge in country music, eventually being named the #1 song on that end-of-the-year chart.   A grateful Otto has said, “The feel of that melody and that hook just sounds sexy, but I had no idea it was going to do what it did.  I thought it sounded like a hit, but it was a shock to me when it became what it became.  It was surprise after surprise, week after week.”

84
“Working for the Weekend”
Loverboy
1982
Peak:   #29
A great anthem for workaday stiffs everywhere!  Furthermore, it rocks in a power pop sort of way that is not typical of this band.  Perhaps they tuned in to the dancy stuff of the times and really, really wanted a hit.  And this record, like everything else in this treatise, could’ve/should’ve done better than it did.

83
“Rainy Jane”
Davy Jones
1971
Peak:  #52
“It’s up to you to make your own sweet sunshine.”  Well said.  No intro to this catchy tune.  “Rainy Jane” was by far Jones’ most successful single as a solo artist.  Sometimes criticized as a lightweight because of his former role with television’s The Monkees, the fact is the man could sing.

82
“Why Can’t I?”
Liz Phair
2003
Peak:   #32
Her only Top 40 hit.  Racy lyrics about wanting each other though both are in other relationships.  They go further than they know is right but stop short of the ultimate act, though “It’s inevitable.”  They leave their significant others, but Phair acknowledges it’s “gonna take a while” for the two to get it together.  Why?  Never explained; she just remains consumed by the thought of it, looking forward to the day it surely happens.

81
“Love Her Madly”
The Doors
1971
Peak:   #11
The Doors had only three singles go higher on the charts than this Robbie Krieger (guitarist) composition.   It’s about all the occasions his eventual wife Lynn threatened to leave him.  Says Krieger, “Every time we had an argument she used to get pissed off and go out the door, and she’d slam the door so loud the house would shake.”  The song was in the 1994 blockbuster movie Forrest Gump.  Its title would seem to be a tip of the hat to jazz great Duke Ellington, who used to tell concert audiences, “We love you madly.”  The Doors’ normal producer did not have his hand in this one and may have been bitter about it; he’s said, “That’s the song that drove me out of the studio.  That it sold a million copies means nothing to me.  It’s still bad music.”  Needless to say, I beg to differ.

80
“The Story in Your Eyes”
The Moody Blues
1971
Peak:   #23
How is it possible that this English band isn’t in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?  An injustice there, to be sure.  They had 14 Top 40 hits, spanning 24 years  –  1965 to 1988.
A teaching colleague of mine once attended one of their concerts and wound up sitting in the lap of either Justin Hayward or John Lodge; I can’t remember which.  My guess through fuzzy memory would be Hayward, who  wrote “The Story in Your Eyes” and sang lead on it.  The music was energetic, the lyrics profound.  Few rockers give the listener pause.

79
“Runaway”
Bon Jovi
1984
Peak:   #39
His first hit.  He didn’t even have a backing band yet, so this song was recorded with studio musicians.  Question:  In performances in subsequent years what was the only song from Bon Jovi’s first two albums that was regularly performed live?  Answer:  “Runaway.”  Whether the song was or was not about prostitution has been the subject of some debate, but the lines toward the end make the answer to that question clear to me:  “Daddy’s girl learned fast; now she works the night away.”

78
“Lawdy Miss Clawdy”
The Buckinghams
1967
Peak:   #41
Written by Lloyd Price and first recorded by him in 1952, this song stayed on the rhythm and blues chart for exactly half a year!  It has since been covered by many, including Elvis, Little Richard, Johnny Rivers, the Hollies, the Beatles, Joe Cocker, Fats Domino and Conway Twitty.  The Buckinghams’ rendition, with its increased tempo and fantastic brass arrangement, was one of the best.  Less than two minutes, but fully packed with joy!

77
“Coming Around Again”
Carly Simon
1986 – 1987
Peak:   #18
This was the last of Simon’s 10 solo Top 40 hits, and it came more than six years after her previous one.  Not a career resurgence, though, as all but one of the other nine charted higher.  She had three subsequent Hot 100 singles but none made the Top 40.
Simon wrote “Coming Around Again,” and it was better than its peak would suggest.
By the mid-80s she was among the many artists to put out good music after their time of greatest glory had passed, and the listening public wasn’t going to buy in no matter what because fresher voices and faces had assumed command.  This was the theme song to the dramedy movie Heartburn and was featured in episodes of two soap operas of the day  –  General Hospital and The Bold and the Beautiful.

76
“Suavecito”
Malo
1972
Peak:   #18
Here’s the Latin sound exemplified to near perfection by an unknown band formed by well-known Carlos Santana’s brother Jorge.  It was Malo’s one and only shining moment.  “Malo” means “bad” in Spanish but “good” in Mayan.  The Spanish word “suavecito” mean means “softly” or “smoothly,” but if you lend an ear to this sweet and beautiful musical endeavor, a traditional translation will be far from necessary.

75
“Pretty Lady”
Lighthouse
1973
Peak:   #53
Lighthouse was named the Best Canadian Group of the Year three straight times in the early 1970s, when they would tour 300 days a year!   With their prominent horns, I always thought they sounded a lot like Chicago.  “Pretty Lady” was their most recent of five songs to make the Hot 100 in this country.   It was an uplifting, exhilarating number that should’ve been a Top 40 hit.

74
“Showdown”
Electric Light Orchestra
1974
Peak:   #53
A funky beat joined ELO’s traditional strings in this vastly underachieving song.  Jeff Lynne, of course, wrote it.  He also played lead guitar with Marc Bolan (T. Rex)’s Gibson Firebird guitar.  It was one of John Lennon’s favorite songs.  He said,” ‘Showdown,’ I thought, was a great record and I was expecting it to be #1, but I don’t think UA (the record company United Artists) got their fingers out and pushed it.  And it’s a nice group.  I call them ‘Son of Beatles,’ although they’re doing things we never did, obviously.  But I remember a statement they made when they first formed was to carry on from where the Beatles left off with “[I Am the] Walrus,” and they certainly did.” 

73
“Centerfield”
John Fogerty
1985
Peak:   #44
From Little League to the majors baseball has embraced this song, playing it at games at all levels.  
Always a big fan of the sport, Fogerty performed “Centerfield” at the Hall of Fame induction ceremony in 2010, becoming the only musician to have a song thus honored by MLB.  Willie Mays, a center fielder mentioned in the song, was in attendance.  Despite failing to become a Top 40 hit, “Centerfield” has since been downloaded ¾ of a million times and is unquestionably Fogerty’s finest post-Creedence Clearwater Revival accomplishment.  At the start of the 2011 season Rolling Stone magazine claimed there were 15 better baseball songs.  That assertion has to be one of their dumbest moments!  Here’s a more legitimate criticism:  “Center field” is two words, not one!

72
“Shattered (Turn the Car Around)”
O.A.R.
2008
Peak:   #36
Of a Revolution’s Mark Roberge:  “What this song’s really about is these people…coming up to you, ‘Man, if my boss wasn’t such a jerk, I’d be making…whatever.’  Or ‘If my wife didn’t hold me back, I would be a football player.’ Whatever it is, everyone’s always got these complaints they’re blaming on everyone around them.  And they’re constantly saying, ‘Man, I was the shit without you.  I could do whatever I wanted.’  You know, all these things.  And the main line at the end where it says, ‘I’ve gotta turn this thing around,’ it’s basically just saying it’s not about all these other people.  It’s not about people holding you back.  It’s really about you.”

71
“No Reply at All”
Genesis
1981
Peak:   #29
Phil Collins invited the Earth, Wind & Fire horn section to play on this one.  Collins said, “People hated it.”  The sound was a departure for what Genesis had been to that point, yet it still contained some of their trademark complicated yet melodic base work.  Critics disliked the song, it was commercially unpopular, and fans even booed when Genesis did it live in a concert in the Netherlands.  Nearly 30 years later Collins admitted the song wasn’t good live.  Interesting, then, with all of this, that “No Reply at All” spent more than a third of the year in the Hot 100, which was longer than most of the group’s Top 10 entries!

70
“Heartbreak Warfare”
John Mayer
2010
Peak:   #34
Soft rock with a hint of blues is Mayer’s thing.  There was speculation that this song was about actress Jennifer Aniston, with whom Mayer had had a relationship, but he denied it.  He added, “I think if there’s any intrigue  –  it would be silly of me to ask somebody not to be intrigued  –  but I think when the music starts playing, you’re not thinking about my life; you’re thinking about yours.”  He also believes the use of jealousy contributes mightily to love being a battlefield, as is evident in the lyrics here.

69
“I Got to Know”
Starbuck
1976
Peak:   #43
Starbuck’s monster hit was “Moonlight Feels Right,” but the trademark light-hearted, infectious and mildly sensuous sound was evident here too.  This band was big in the mid-to-late 1970s, touring at various times with Boston, the Electric Light Orchestra, and Hall & Oates.  Xylophone solo, anyone?

68
“I Do”
The J. Geils Band
1982 – 1983
Peak:   #24
This live version made the charts after the studio version four years prior did not.  It pays tribute to the doo-wop sound of the ’50s and the rhythm and blues of the ’60s.
The Marvelows took this song to #37 in 1965 in their only Top 40 appearance.  The J. Geils Band had bigger hits but no better songs.

67
“Story Untold”
The Nutmegs
1955
Peak:  Did not chart!
In 1955 the all-white Crew Cuts took this song to #16 just after the all-black Nutmegs
failed to chart.  This was unquestionably a case of racial discrimination, as the Nutmegs’ version jumped to #2 almost immediately upon release on the black-friendly
rhythm and blues chart.  Which version was better?  Not even close!

66
“Rainy Day People”
Gordon Lightfoot
1975
Peak:   #26
Sometimes the humble, modest, and uncomplicated rule the day.  Few knew this better than Gordon Lightfoot.  And he could write lyrics, as in the first few lines here:  “Rainy Day People always seem to know when it’s time to call.  Rainy Day People don’t talk; they just listen till they’ve heard it all.”  Lightfoot may well’ve been the greatest songwriter from Canada ever, even if my saying so makes Leonard Cohen twitch if not roll over in his grave.  Lightfoot’s compositions have been recorded by the industry’s finest.  The list includes Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Johnny Mathis, Elvis Presley, Barbra Streisand and Neil Young.  Lightfoot on Dylan covering “Early Morning Rain” (See #55 to come later):  “I was totally blown away that he would record one of my songs in the first place.  It helped my career  –  I’d not had a hit single myself at that point.  His cover was a linchpin in that whole process because it made people in the industry aware that I was producing good songs.”

65
“I Got a Line on You”
Spirit
1969
Peak:   #25
Jimi Hendrix had two Randy’s in his band; one was from California.  To distinguish between the two, Hendrix gave the 15-year-old the moniker “Randy California.”  The rest, as they say, was history.  “I Got a Line on You” is a hard-driving rocker.  It was covered by Blackfoot, Alice Cooper and others  –  often more than 10 years later.  On Spirit’s style a reviewer wrote, “The band’s fusion of jazz, rock, folk, blues and psychedelia has never been matched in its intensity, originality, and consistent quality.” Bassist Mark Andes went on to play with Firefall and Heart.  California met a tragic fate at the age of 45 in 1997.  He successfully rescued his 12-year-old son from a Pacific Ocean undertow but died himself.  So, he was just a teenager when he wrote what would become, over the years, a rock classic  –  “I Got a Line on You.”  A biography on him ended the words, “Randy California’s musical genius will be sorely missed, but his Spirit will always live on.”

64

“Where Are They Now?”
Robin Wilson
1968
Peak:   Did not chart!
She recorded only one album, and it didn’t sell.  So I’m confident you’ve never heard of this native Hawaiian with brown hair and a brunette pageboy haircut.  But she played Las Vegas, appeared on The Merv Griffin Show, and got signed by A&M Records.  However, her easy-on-the-ears style was rapidly going out of vogue.  A&M signed the Carpenters around the same time, and Karen Carpenter’s voice was better.  No shame in losing that comparison, but it sure didn’t help Wilson’s career to have the darlings of the soft pop sound on the same record label!  She disappeared quickly and quietly.
[To get the song on You Tube, type into Google “Robin Wilson Album 1968.”  The track we’re seeking starts at 12:32.]

63
“Come Home, Baby”
Terry Knight
1967
Peak:   Did not chart!
Terry Knight and the Pack were legendary on a relatively small stage  –  the state of Michigan in the mid-Sixties.  They even opened for the Rolling Stones at Cobo Hall in Detroit in 1965.  The band was reasonably well-known in the states around Michigan.
“Come Hone, Baby” was one of just a few singles credited to Terry Knight only, and their failure on the national scene ended Knight’s brief recording career.  But this cover of a song originally done by Wilson Pickett was good stuff.  Knight was stabbed to death at the age of 61 in 2004 by his daughter’s boyfriend, who claimed to be high on meth.

62
“Hushabye”
The Mystics
1959
Peak:   #20
The doo-wop group’s finest moment, to be sure.  The glowing harmonies were so pure.
The Mystics were inducted into the Doo Wop Hall of Fame in 2015 and are still performing  –  59 years later!  Believe it or not, they still sound pretty good, especially on this, their signature song.  “Guardian angels up above, take care of the one I love.”
And while you’re at it, take care of the members of the Mystics, who are now about 80 years old!

61
“What Might Have Been”
Little Texas
1994
Peak:   #74
A country group puts out a fabulous record with sort of a reserved pop sound.  Can’t change the past or know what would have happened had things worked out favorably.
Or maybe they did.  Who doesn’t have such a relationship or two in their past?  “When you cross my mind, I try not to think about what might have been, ’cause that was then, and we have taken different roads.”

60
“Love You Like a Love Song
Selena Gomez & the Scene
2012
Peak:   #22
Gomez says the song is “one of those tracks that’s addictive because it’s kind of repetitive in the best way,” adding it’s a number that “you can’t get out of your head.”
She says it’s about “the honeymoon stage” in a relationship, when things are new.  Reviews were mixed, with criticism of the juvenile lyrics, weak production, and monotone vocals which sucked any passion from the song.  It got as high as #35 in July of 2011 before sinking from the top 50 over a period of months.  Then it recovered, reaching its overall peak in March of 2012  –  eight months after its initial high.

59                                                                                                                                                     Benjamin Orr
“Stay the Night

1987
Peak:   #24
Founding member, bass guitarist and backing vocalist for the Cars.  Orr had one shining moment as a solo act; this was it.  And it should’ve shined brighter.  Orr died of pancreatic cancer in 2000 at the age of 53.  Of course, his music  –  and especially this song  –  live on.  And if its inclusion in this list in some very small way helps it to do so, I am honored to have obliged.  Ten years after Orr passed, the surviving Cars reunited for their seventh studio album.  In the liner notes:  “Ben, your spirit was with us on this one.”

58
“Try a Little Tenderness”
Three Dog Night
1969
Peak:   #29
Three Dog Night amassed 21 Top 40 hits; this was the first one.  Otis Redding took the song to a slightly higher position on the charts a few years earlier, but Three Dog Night’s version was better.  Cory Wells sang it brilliantly in a performance that never received the recognition it deserved.  Listen to the studio version and focus your attention on crisp clarity of his voice in the first half of this number.  Like the song says, “You know you won’t regret it, no.”

57
“Shakin’ “
Eddie Money
1982
Peak:   #63
“Rosanna’s daddy had a car she loved to drive…Stole the keys one night and took me for a ride.  Turned up the music just as loud as it could go, Blew out the speakers in her daddy’s radio.”  The actress and model Apollonia appears in the video, in which she drag races as well as doing some shakin’.  She would later star in Prince’s movie Purple Rain.  For a song that never got near the Top 40 the line, “Her tits were shakin’ till the middle of the night” is pretty well-known.  Few folks, though, realize that the original lyric was, “We did some shakin’ till the middle of the night.”  The sexually-charged line is edgier.

56
“Smile”
Lily Allen
2007
Peak:   #49
Less vengeful lyrics by British singer Lily Allen would have landed her  bigger hit.  But at least her words were consistent with her attitude toward the opposite sex.  She says, “Women are better at everything than men.”  The melody here is energetic and happy, in direct contrast to the lyrics.  In the accompanying video she hires thugs to beat up her ex, which makes her “smile.”  She also has his apartment trashed and spikes his drink to make him violently sick to his stomach.  After everything was out there, she regretted her lyrical bluntness.

55
“Early Morning Rain”
Peter, Paul & Mary
1965
Peak:   #91
Simple tune, simple idea, simple lyrics…but simply a masterful creation.  The composer was Gordon Lightfoot; among others who recorded it were the Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan (See #65), and Elvis Presley.  But Peter, Paul & Mary’s rendition was at once forlorn, beautiful, and extraordinary; it was the only version ever to reach the Hot 100. This was Lightfoot’s first work to achieve notoriety.  The narrator is nearly destitute, both literally and figuratively, as he observes a Boeing 707 taking off:  “I’m stuck here on the grass where the pavement never grows” and “You can’t jump a jet plane like you can a freight train, so I’d best be on my way in the early morning rain.”

54
“Call It Love”
Poco
1989
Peak:   #18
Bass guitarist Randy Meisner left Poco and joined the Eagles in 1969.   Remarkably, his replacement Timothy B. Scmitt followed suit in 1977!  The group had a few hits in the ’70s but disbanded in 1984.  Four years later they got back together with the five original band members, which included Meisner as well as Jim Messina of Loggins & Messina.  The reunion produced this often overlooked number.  “When it’s all you’ve got, call it love.”

53
“Always the Last to Know”
Del Amitri
1992
Peak:   #30
This is one of author Stephen King’s favorite songs.  It’s a calm and thoughtful treatise on infidelity.  And that knife cuts both ways.  The alternative band Del Amitri was formed when teenager Justin Currie put an ad in the window of a music store in his native Scotland, asking interested musicians to contact him.

52
“Marvin Gaye”
Charlie Puth feat. Meghan Trainor
2015
Peak:   #21
“Marvin Gaye” is a verb; it’s something you do!  What, exactly?  Use your imagination!  
Puth said the lyrics were “an effort to spark romance and get that special someone in the mood, just as many Gaye slow jams have done for millions.”  Trainor once exchanged music with Puth at a party; when she heard “Marvin Gaye,” she asked if she could sing on it.  Puth was taken aback, as Trainor had become a star and he was still a nobody.  The song was recorded in one take.  As was the case with a lot of songs in this list, it was much bigger in the rest of the world than it was in the United States, even going to #1 in four countries.

51
“Gentle on My Mind”
Glen Campbell
1968
Peak:   #39
How could this not have become a bigger hit?  I theorized that at the time Campbell was known as predominantly a country singer, and the listening public was not yet ready to embrace him as a “crossover” artist.  So I did some research and found that Campbell had eight 45s peak at #25 or higher  –  and all eight of them came after “Gentle on My Mind.”  Theory confirmed.

50
“Highway Song”
Blackfoot
1979
Peak:   #26
Included in the lyrics to the third verse are a handful of titles to previous Blackfoot songs.  “Highway Song” was a poor man’s “Freebird” by Lynyrd Skynyrd.  Southern rock legend Rickey Medlocke, who fronted Blackfoot and has had two stints with Lynyrd Skynyrd, enjoyed his finest hour as a composer when he co-wrote this start slow/finish fast rocker that was accused of being a rip-off of a classic.  Both close with searing guitar work.  You decide.

49
“Sour Suite”
The Guess Who
1971 – 1972
Peak:   #50
Lead singer Burton Cummings took almost three days to pen this gloomy, seemingly autobiographical-in-the-moment song of hollow desperation, emptiness, and disillusionment.  The lyric, “It’s just like four-six-two-oh-one” refers to a real-life zip code in Indianapolis.  He’d just received a letter from a female fan there and used part of her return address to complete his heartfelt creation.   The Guess Who had six Top 10 hits in this country and was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 1987.

48                                                                 
“Yellow”                                                                           
Coldplay                                                    

2000
Peak:   #48
Simply put, “Yellow” made Coldplay popular.  The song was recorded the same night it was written.  Mid-tempo songs are not often so sad, as in, “For you I bleed myself dry.”
Rolling Stone called it “unrepentantly romantic.”  It earned a pair of Grammy nominations.  Even though “Yellow” failed to reach the Top 40, it found its way onto eight different Billboard charts!  By far my favorite song by Chris Martin and company.

47
“You Got Lucky”
Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
1982
Peak:   #20
I know I’m in the minority when I say this, but “You Got Lucky” was Tom Petty’s best song.  Rather than his usual guitar-driven sound, this song is built on synthesizers.  And the song was recorded over a drum loop.  All of this served to create a distinctive flair for a Tom Petty recording and, really, for a pop song in general.  Petty passed away while this exposition was in production.  Ironically, the cause of death was a heart attack.

46
“Almost Hear You Sigh”
The Rolling Stones
1990
Peak:   #50
Breakups rarely come off smoothly.  In this one…  “You had a stone cold look in your eye.”  Nominated for a Grammy for Best Rock Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group.
Kudos to Mick Jagger, but Keith Richards’ rhythm guitar shines as well.  The result is that unmistakable Rolling Stones sound.  The Stones had eight #1 songs, most of them in the Sixties.  To be nominated for a Grammy for a new tune more than 20 years later… well, “The World’s Greatest Rock and Roll Band,” indeed!

45
“Summer Sun”
Jamestown Massacre
1972
Peak:   #90
This was Jamestown Massacre’s only significant song.  It sounds more like Chicago than Chicago does!  In fact the band was from Chicago, Illinois!  The song is rock and roll with horns, it’s fun to listen to, it feels like summer, and it should have garnered far more attention than it did.  I saw Jamestown Massacre in concert at Chippewa Lake Park, just south of Medina, Ohio, in the early 1970s.

44
“The One You Love”
Glenn Fry
1982
Peak:   #15
Even though two of his singles reached the chart’s pinnacle and two others climbed higher than this one did, “The One You Love” was the Eagles stalwart’s best solo effort.
Not one, but two saxophonists played on the record.  A girl has to decide between the one she loves and the one who loves her.  It’s a dilemma, a love triangle, that many can relate to, which doubtless heightened this song’s popularity.  Great groove, though.

43
“I Wouldn’t Want to Be Like You”
The Alan Parsons Project
1977
Peak:   #36
The gym darkens.  The home basketball team waits at its locker room door.  As the anticipatory intro plays on the loudspeakers, a spotlight is trained on the team’s entrance to the gym.  You can feel in the music that something is about to happen. As the drums kick in, followed by heavy guitar, the team takes its cue to run onto the floor.  The house lights go on as the vocal begins moments later.  The teams start their warm-ups to the rest of the song.  Perfect music for such a scenario:  The little-known “I Wouldn’t Want to Be Like You.”  The Alan Parsons Project was a varying collection of studio musicians and semi-permanent band members all headed by Parsons and Eric Woolfson, whose credits included extensive work on the Beatles’ albums Let It Be and Abbey Road, as well as Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon.  Not a bad resumé.

42
“Fallen Angel”
Frankie Valli
1976
Peak:   #36
This was one of my favorites when I was in college at Canton, Ohio.  It was one of Valli’s too.  Five years ago he was asked by an interviewer, “What’s the best hidden gem in your catalogue?”  The front man for the Four Seasons responded, “One of my favorite songs we did that not a lot of people are familiar with is 1976’s ‘Fallen Angel.’ ”  So there you go.  It was about Valli’s drug-addicted and estranged daughter.  After many years the two got back on the same page, but she died at the tender age of 20 of an “unintentional drug overdose.”

41
“1979”
Smashing Pumpkins
1996
Peak:   #12
Frontman Billy Corgan is said to have written over 50 songs for the album Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness.  This was the last one and it was barely finished in time. So, of course it would become the biggest hit the alternative rock band ever had.  Corgan was 12 years old in 1979, and the song is about him becoming an adolescent, so it’s very personal to him.  It was nominated for two Grammys.  The sound is unique and the lyrics are far out there.  I always liked the lines, “Justine never knew the rules, hung down with the freaks and ghouls.”  Who didn’t have a friend or two who seemed to run with the wrong crowd?  On one hand this song should’ve been a bigger hit.  On the other it’s surprising it was as big as it was.

40
“What About Me?”
Moving Pictures
1983
Peak:   #29
The Australian band had this one great hit.  Though its peak was relatively low, it stayed in the Hot 100 long enough to make Billboard’s year-end Top 100 songs.  “What About Me?” also made a rare return to the charts six years later.  The songwriter’s inspiration was seeing an otherwise unnoticed young boy waiting at a lunch counter.

39
“Make It Easy on Yourself”
The Walker Brothers
1965
Peak:   #16
Famed songwriters Burt Bacharach and Hal David.  Jerry Butler took the song to #20 in 1962, Dionne Warwick to #37 in 1970.  Others to record it include Bacharach himself, Johnny Mathis, Glen Campbell, Tony Bennett, the Four Seasons, Connie Francis and Sarah Vaughan.  The meaning of all this?  Simply a great song!  David’s uncomplicated lyrics went straight to the heart:  “And if the way I hold you can’t compare to his caress, no words of consolation will make me miss you less.”

38
“Home”
Michael Bublé
2005
Peak:   #72
Although this tune inexplicably never even sniffed the Top 40, its success on the adult contemporary chart, where it soared to the #1 spot, got a neophyte recording artist the recognition he sought.  Country music’s Blake Shelton went to the top spot on the country singles chart with his cover of “Home” three years later.  Interestingly, Shelton’s version also saw significantly greater success on the Billboard Hot 100 than Bublé’s original.  Bublé was one of three songwriters.  His voice soothes.

37

“I Put a Spell on You”
Creedence Clearwater Revival
1968
Peak:   #58
Several hundred covers of this 1956 Screamin’ Jay Hawkins composition have been recorded, but CCR’s may be the best and is probably better-known than Hawkins’ original.  It illustrates the band’s abilities as well as any of its own John Fogerty-penned hits, of which there would be many.  But this one and “Suzie Q” were the songs that put ’em on the map.

36
“Runaway”
Jefferson Starship
1978
Peak:   #12
This group was Jefferson Airplane back in its beginning and would later become just Starship.  The name changed with the times, as did their music.  They adapted to what they thought people wanted to hear, and, for the most part, they had their thumb on the pulse of pop music for a long time.  In one incarnation or another, this group would place songs in the Top 40 for more than 20 years  (1967 – 1989).  “Runaway” was a lustrous, smooth, and stylish number with an easy beat.  Pop music to the hilt.  But there’s nothing wrong with that.  Glad it didn’t quite make the Top 10  –  so it could make this list!

35
“Insensitive”
Jann Arden
1996
Peak:   #12
Anybody want to really FEEL a song?  Here’s your ticket.  Canadian Arden wrote all of her own stuff except for this one, and it was by far her most well-known achievement.
Arden heard songwriter Anne Loree perform the song in a club in Calgary.  Loree was a waitress writing about a failed relationship with a chef where she worked.  She says, “I sat down at my electric piano in the basement of a rented house I shared with four roommates, broke and brokenhearted, full of pain and angst, and wrote ‘Insensitive.’  It took me probably less than half an hour and I walked away feeling much better for it and much hipper to Prince Charmings who aren’t really into you.”  Why did it take the song so long to catch on in this country?  From the book Canadian Music and American Culture:  Get Away From Me on this topic:  “The ignorance of the U.S. market was profound.”

34
“Peacekeeper”
Fleetwood Mac
2003
Peak:   # 80
Probably the group’s signature accomplishment without keyboardist Christine McVie.  I’ve always been a fan, but the first time I absentmindedly heard this on the radio, I thought, “That’s a terrific song” without even recognizing that it was Fleetwood Mac.  I prefer the album version, with Stevie Nicks joining Lindsey Buckingham on vocals, to the single. Both are great, but having Nicks singing along makes it “Fleetwood Mac-ier.”  Written and released 25 years sooner than it was, “Peacekeeper” would have been one of the wildly popular band’s greatest hits.

33
“Am I the Same Girl”
Swing Out Sister
1992
Peak:   #45
Spot-on lead vocals by former fashion designer and model Corrine Drewery.  Went to #1 on adult contemporary chart.  Martha Stewart used this as the opening theme song of her television show Martha more than ten years later.  Young-Holt Unlimited took an instrumental version of the song to #3 in 1968 under a different title  –  “Soulful Strut.”

32 
“Mammy Blue”
The Pop-Tops
1971
Peak:   #57
Maybe the extra “m” in the title was the proverbial kiss of death.  “Mammy Blue” failed to reach the Top 40 in the United States, but “Mamy Blue” was a wordwide hit, going to the very top of the charts in more than ten countries, including France, Germany and Italy.  Our neighbors to the north were smarter than we were, where the song peaked at #4!  It had French lyrics at inception and was also recorded in Spanish.  The Stories followed up their #1 smash “Brother Louie” with a cover of “Mammy Blue,” which got to #50 in 1973, but it lacked the haunting, forlorn, desperate-for-redemption nature of the Pop-Tops version.

31
“All I Could Do Was Cry”
Etta James
1960
Peak:   #33
Bluesy delivery by one of the best female vocalists ever.  Beyoncé covered this song more than 40 years later.  Besides the blues, James sang gospel, jazz, rock, R & B, and soul.  She won several Grammys and was nominated for many more.  She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.  Rolling Stone included her on its list of the 100 greatest artists of all time.  All this in spite of physical abuse as a youngster and later heroin addiction, for which she was in and out of rehab several times.  Her mother was 14 when James was born and famed pool hustler Minnesota Fats could have been her father.  Among musicians whose style has been impacted by James:  Janis Joplin, Diana Ross, Mick Jagger, Rod Stewart, Christina Aguilera, and Adele.  Wow!  If you know of a more powerful vocal than James delivers here, let me know.

30
“The River Is Wide”
The Forum
1968
Peak:   #45
The Grass Roots would take this song to #31 in 1969, but I much prefer this more evocative version, which was released both in 1966 and 1967 without going anywhere on the charts.  The third time was the charm, as a DJ in Seattle started playing it and got the ball rolling.  I have the album of the same name; the title track is the only noteworthy song.  Never heard of the Forum, did you?

29
“To the Moon and Back”
Savage Garden
1998
Peak:   #24
Savage Garden was so convinced they had a hit on their hands that they released the song twice in the late 1990s.  They would be disappointed.  But I agree with the Australian duo:  This lyrically gut-wrenching masterstroke about teenage estrangement and the resulting desperate desire for a rescuing romance should have seen greater success.  “Mama never loved her much, and Daddy never keeps in touch. That’s why she shies away from human affection.  But somewhere in a private place she packs her bags for outer space, and now she’s waiting for the right kind of pilot to come.”

28
“You Get What You Give
New Radicals
1999
Peak:   #36
One of the best one-hit wonders ever.  A partly spoken, partly sung chorus that promoted a natural high in the listener, who could happily sing along.  And there’s a hint of spirituality in the line, “We only get what we give.”  The end of the tune gets political with criticism of the health care and banking industries.  There’s also a put-down of the fame accrued by musicians Hanson and Marilyn Manson, among others.  Manson didn’t object to being threatened with an ass-kicking as much as being named in a sentence with Courtney Love!  Still, the band had supporters in the music business.  U2’s The Edge says “You Get What You Give” is a song he wishes he had written.  Joni Mitchell said, “The only thing I heard in many years that I thought had greatness in it was the New Radicals.  I loved that song ‘You Get What You Give.’ “

27
“It’s Cold Outside”
The Choir
1967
Peak:   #68
The Choir was a garage band from Cleveland, Ohio, and this tune is one of the classics of that genre.  Written by drummer Dann Klawon, it equates a broken love affair to the often dreary Northeast Ohio weather, utilizing the British Invasion sound, as The Choir often played stuff by the Beatles, the Who and the Stones.  All three of Cleveland’s Top 40 radio stations had the song go to #1, but the reception elsewhere was lukewarm.  Hmm…wildly popular around town without making a mark nationally.  Sound familiar, Michael Stanley fans?  Interestingly, one of that Cleveland paragon’s best songs, “Lover,” would also peak at #68 fourteen years later!  (See #26, coming next!)  Also of interest:  Klawon was the only member of the original group that did NOT go on to join Eric Carmen to form the Raspberries.

26
“Lover”
Michael Stanley Band
1981
Peak:   #68
To think I might never have heard of this song if I didn’t live in the Midwest!  With Clarence Clemons of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band on saxophone, this number is arguably Michael Stanley’s best composition.  The song about driving alone at night in an Ohio winter while his soon-to-be-ex-girlfriend plans to go out with another guy contains the regionally legendary line, “Thank God for the man who put the white lines on the highway.”  In concerts nowadays Stanley lets the audience sing this line.  I’ve seen him twice in recent years at the Wayne County Fairgrounds; after we sing it, he says, “God bless you, Wooster!”

25
“Who Do We Think We Are”
John Legend feat. Rick Ross
2013
Peak:   Did not chart!
I’m no gamer, so I didn’t even know this fantabulous musical creation was on the soundtrack of the video game NBA 2K14 by 2K Sports.  LeBron James was on the cover, albeit in a Miami Heat uniform after he’d rejoined the Cleveland Cavaliers, and he picked the 20 songs on the soundtrack.  Kanye West helped produce the album from which this song came, and one can hear his stamp all over this number.  Lenny Kravitz emcees at the beginning and again at the end.  I like it because in the era of angry rap and hip-hop, it’s rhythm and blues with a cozy, elevating feel to it.  Legend believes it’s about living with gusto and taking risks and boldly chasing your dreams, adding, “It’s also about enjoying and luxuriating in your pursuits.”  Almost hypnotic, terrific stuff  –  no matter what year the calendar shows.  You could take it back and put it in the early 1970s, and it would fit right in with the Philadelphia sound or Motown  –  without Rick Ross, of course.  I’m wondering how high “Who Do You Think You Are” would have climbed on this list without the rapper’s “contribution.”

24
“Somewhere Only We Know”
Keane
2005
Peak:   #50
Piano-driven number by English alternative rockers.  Is “Somewhere Only We Know” literally a geographical location, or is it a place an individual goes to in a metaphorical sense?  Or is an attempted reliving of an experience?  As is the case with a lot of good pop songs, the interpretation is up to the listener.  The video has the band playing the song in the middle of a shallow creek while woods fairies approve with ET-like heart lights.  “Oh, simple thing, where have you gone?  I’m getting old and I need something to rely on.”

23
“Lady Lynda”
The Beach Boys
1979
Peak:   Did not chart!
While most Beach Boys compositions were creations of the incomparable Brian Wilson, this one was written by band member Al Jardine for his then-wife.  In the final lyrical line he proposes marriage.  Performed live, the song highlighted the incredible harmonizing of a band known for it more than anything else they ever did.  With reworked lyrics the song was re-titled “Lady Liberty” to acknowledge and celebrate the reopening of the refurbished Statue of Liberty.  Additionally the song was done as “Little Lady” in performances after Jardine and Lynda divorced.  I took in the Beach Boys several times back in the day at Blossom Music Center.  First time I ever heard “Lady Lynda,” and no live performance of anything ever impressed me more.

22
“Run to You”
Whitney Houston
1993
Peak:   #31
This, the fourth single from the soundtrack of the motion picture The Bodyguard, didn’t fare nearly as well as the first three, all of which were Top 5.  Why?  Because 21,000,000 copies of the movie soundtrack had already been sold and people had this song on the album, so why buy the single?  Certainly “Run to You” would’ve been a much bigger hit if released before its fellow Bodyguard numbers, or if it weren’t associated with the movie at all.  It could’ve and would’ve stood on its own, as one of the supremely talented Whitney’s finest.  However, it must be noted, The Bodyguard is the best-selling soundtrack ever.

21
“Harry Hippie”
Bobby Womack
1973
Peak:   #31
Though it was written for him rather than by him, this song was Womack’s tribute to his carefree and anti-materialistic brother Harry, who would end up stabbed to death two years after it came out.  Bobby offers, “We used to laugh and joke about the song when I’d sing it.  When he was brutally killed in my home, it was by a jealous girlfriend who he’d lived with for five years.  She fought a lot, violence.  And in our home it was considered less than a man to fight a woman, so he didn’t fight back.”  Bobby had hired a bass player to replace Harry in hopes that not being on the road would help Harry’s domestic relationship.  Bobby again:  “That turned out to be very sour.  He ended up losing his life behind it.  At that time ‘Harry Hippie’ wasn’t a joke anymore.  I had lost a brother.”

20
“The Captain of Her Heart”
Double
1985
Peak:   #16
With this gorgeous ballad the duo became the first Swiss musical act to have a song reach the Top 40  –  and deservedly so.  It went Top 10 in five countries; why it didn’t fare better in this country remains inexplicable.  Sadly, Double (pronounced “Doob-LAY”) was a one-hit wonder, but the greatness of this tune can’t be overstated.  It’s classy, sophisticated, graceful and sweet without crossing the line to saccharine.  “Too long ago, too long apart.  She couldn’t wait another day for The Captain of Her Heart.”

19
“Oh My Lady”
The Stampeders
1973
Peak:   Did not chart!
This trio had only two Top 40 hits in the United States but 15 in their native Canada.  “Oh My Lady” went to #12 up north but only “bubbled under” in this country.  One of the best songs ever to have missed the Hot 100 altogether.  Originally called the Rebounds, these guys were from Calgary and, desiring to connect better with their roots, renamed themselves to match the professional football team from their hometown.  “Oh My Lady” was written by their drummer, who had a great stage name  –  Kim Berly.  Get it?  KimBerly!

18
“My Kind of Lady”
Supertramp
1983
Peak:   #31
Why was it never performed live?  Because writer and singer Rick Davies alternately utilizes his echo-enhanced natural voices and a falsetto, and through tracking and mixing in the recording studio, harmonizes with himself.  The song is done in a ’50s doo-wop style, as is the black-and-white video.  Despite appearances in the video, Davies actually sang all parts.

17
“Can’t Do a Thing (To Stop Me)”
Chris Isaak
1993
Peak:   Did not chart!
He intentionally dreams of a woman, finds one just like her, and wryly notes that she’s powerless to keep him from doing so.  He can’t even help himself.  Sensuous stuff from a not-that-well-known musician and sometimes actor.  His song here narrowly missed the chart, bubbling under at #105.

16
“Last Christmas”
Wham!
2016 – 2017
Peak:   #41
George Michael wrote, produced and sang what has become a Christmas standard that really doesn’t have a lot to do with Christmas, as is the case with the song “River,” which is at #166 on this list.  Both songs deal with relationships gone awry.  Royalties from “Last Christmas” went to famine relief in Ethiopia.  The song was originally released in 1984 but didn’t chart in this country until shortly after Michael’s death, which ironically came on Christmas Day just last year.  But the song has been a favorite of mine for more than three decades.  In Michael’s native UK “Last Christmas” has never gone to #1, yet it is the best-selling single of all time!  It has found itself in the Top 40 of the UK singles chart around the holidays twelve times, including every year from 2011 to the present.  It has made the Top 10 on this British chart four times. Don’t you think this phenomenal, oft-covered tune deserves to go to #1 at least once? There’s always this year, I guess, and you can be sure “Last Christmas” will make a run at it.  Or is it destined to always be yet another “song that should’ve been bigger?”

15
“Island in the Sun”
Weezer
2001
Peak:   Did not chart!
A feel-good song if ever there was one!  Carefree summer days of frivolous fun while on vacation.  The lyrics say it well:  “Just a place to call your own as we drift into the zone.”  There were two videos.  The one with the band members communing and frolicking with semi-wild animals in a remote spot is really cute.  (Google “Island in the Sun, Spike Jonze Version.”)

14
“So In Love”
Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark
1985
Peak:   #26
It took the English band OMD five years to hit the charts in the United States, and they finally did so with this finely-crafted song.  One music critic called it “a rich and sumptuous number,” while another said it and the following year’s “If You Leave” were the “pinnacle” of the group’s evolution.   “If You Leave” was a bigger hit and a fine tune, but this one was better!   And, of course, I love the sax in the latter half.

13
“Found Out About You”
Gin Blossoms
1994
Peak:   #25
Guitarist and Gin Blossoms co-founder Doug Hopkins wrote this song.  Chronically depressed all his life, he was an alcoholic and got fired from the band before this was released.  It was either kick him out of the group or get dropped by their record label. Hopkins was in dire financial straits as he watched the Gin Blossoms succeed by performing songs he had written.  He received a gold record for “Hey Jealousy” but soon destroyed it.  Hopkins was in detox when he sneaked out and bought a gun, using it the next day to commit suicide in early December of 1993.  The Gin Blossoms were never the same without him.  “All last summer in case you don’t recall, I was yours and you were mine.  Forget it all…Did you love me only in my head?  There were things you said and did to me; they seemed to come so easily.  The love I thought I’d won you give for free.  Whispers at the bus stop.  Well, I’ve heard about nights at the school yard…Rumors follow everywhere you go…You’re famous now and there’s no doubt; in all the places you hang out, they know your name and they know what you’re about…I write your name, drive past your house.  Your boyfriend’s over; I watch your lights go out.”  Had he been jilted?  Too kind a word.  Was he despondent?  Too kind a word.  Wow!  As a poet myself, wow!

12
“Hold On”
Ian Gomm
1979
Peak:   #18
A one-hit wonder featuring saxophone  –  right up my alley!  But it’s become obscure, and because it’s now 38 years old, a forgotten oldie.  Gomm wrote this great song and co-wrote Nick Lowe’s “Cruel to Be Kind.”  “Hold On” reminds us that the grass isn’t always greener on the other side; in fact, it rarely is.  A comment on You Tube:  “You never hear good songs like this on the radio anymore.”  I have to agree; notice how few of the tunes on this list came after the turn of the century.

11
“How Did I Get By Without You?”
John Waite
1995
Peak:   #89
After his 1984 megahit “Missing You” Waite felt he’d never do better.  The former lead singer of the Babys and Bad English was right, but “How Did I Get By Without You?” was nonetheless a fine song and should’ve done far better than the blip on the radar screen it was.  More than solid musically.  The lyrics were pedestrian at best, but my like/dislike for a song as a whole is, as previously stated here, almost always more dependent on the melody and chords.  Again, it’s a strange thing for a professed poet to admit, but it’s been true all my life.  By the way, don’t watch the video if you’re afraid of heights.

10
“Dance Away”
Roxy Music
1979
Peak:   #44
So you’ve heard of many recording artists on this list but not Roxy Music?  Join the club!  The English band never caught on in the United States; they had only one Top 40 single  –  “Love Is the Drug” in 1976.  However, they enjoyed greater success in Europe and Australia in the 1970s.  Some look upon Roxy Music as influential in the development of glam rock, punk, and new wave.  In fact, one music critic argued that among British musicians only the Beatles carried more sway.  Rolling Stone included Roxy Music in their 2004 publication “The Immortals – The 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.”

9
“Alone”
Bee Gees
1997
Peak:   #28
The Brothers Gibb had two distinct careers  –  soft rock in the late 1960s and early 1970s (“To Love Somebody,” “How Can You Mend a Broken Heart?”), front and center for disco in the late 1970s (“Stayin’ Alive,” “You Should Be Dancing”).  The Bee Gees had 30 Top 40 Hits, 15 of which went Top 10.  They had nine #1’s, eight of which came in the disco era.  Almost 20 years later, they released “Alone,” which was strong both lyrically and musically.  Sadly, their time had passed, and the listening public wanted new blood, not some old-timers.  The record faded badly after a stunningly high debut.  But it was undeniably a flawless, finely-crafted piece of pop artistry,  sung by the veterans delicately and intensely at the same time.  Near-perfect in all ways.  Despite what could be deduced by peak chart positions, it was one of the Bee Gees’ best songs ever.  And that’s saying something!

8
“Start the Car”
Jude Cole
1992
Peak:   #71
This song opens the album of the same name and Cole wrote it himself.  He had only two Top 40 hits of his own, both in 1990.  But 15 or more years after these chart successes, he had a hand in writing and/or recording three of Lifehouse’s four Top 40 hits (See #174), including the Top 10 smash “You and Me.”  He also partnered with friend and actor Kiefer Sutherland to create and develop Ironworks Music, which has graduated from recording studio to record label to music publishing outfit.  Cole came from humble beginnings, playing four sets a night to get his start in the business.  In 1993 he married and had two sons with Lori Pfeiffer, the younger sister of actress Michelle Pfeiffer.  Says Cole, now 57, of his career:  “I found I could write songs pretty well, and that provided a life for me.  When I finish a song, it makes me feel that everything’s right.  If I could just write songs for the rest of my life, I’d be a pretty happy guy.”  Well, write on, Mr. Cole, but I’ll always be partial to “Start the Car.”

7
“Moondance”
Van Morrison
1977 – 1978
Peak:   #92
This number started as a jazz saxophone instrumental.  The record also featured the flute.  Uniquely “fantabulous” sound, composed by Morrison himself.  He didn’t have a real good voice, but he was one of the finest songwriters out there.  In the 1981 movie An American Werewolf in London, this song played during the sex scene.   A music reviewer wrote that “Moondance” passed “into the hallowed territory of a standard, a classic.”  Another called it “jazzy sophistication.”  And to think that disco kept it from charting higher!

6
“In Your Letter”
REO Speedwagon
1981
Peak:   #20
When lead guitarist Gary Richrath passed away at the age of 65 in 2015, several obituaries cited this early ’80s song with a ’50s -’60s feel as one of REO Speedwagon’s best.  Penned by Richrath, it was the fourth single from the band’s nine times platinum LP Hi Infidelity, which featured four Top 40 hits.  All told, REO Speedwagon placed 13 songs in the Top 40.  Richrath and fellow front man Kevin Cronin didn’t always get along, which led to Richrath quitting in 1989.  However, he joined the group on stage several times subsequently, and upon Richrath’s death, Cronin announced the band was “dedicating every show we do for the foreseeable future, probably forever, to Gary.”  He also says, “I learned pretty much everything I know about being in a rock-n-roll band from Gary Richrath.”

5
“Tender Years”
John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band
1984 – 1985
Peak:  #31
This group was often accused of ripping off the sound of Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, from the lead singing to the saxophone, but that’s pretty much what Cafferty was hired to do when he provided the score for the film Eddie and the Cruisers.  In it, the actor who plays Eddie lip-syncs to Cafferty’s voice.  The movie flopped at the box office but found significant success on cable TV and home video.  Through the years 35 of Cafferty’s songs have played in major motion pictures, including Rocky IV and There’s Something About Mary.

4
“When You’re Gone”
The Cranberries
1996
Peak:   #22
Powerful and beautiful ballad.  Great number to slow dance to, probably my favorite such song of all time.  Dolores O’Riordan was one of the best relatively unknown female vocalists ever.  A high school friend and I used to say that the best groups could, in concert, sound like their records.  Almost a quarter of a century later the Cranberries came along to put an exclamation mark on the point.  Check out “The Cranberries live in Paris 1999 ‘When You’re Gone’ ” on You Tube or any other live performances of the song as compared to the studio version.  O’Riordan wrote this tune after the passing of her grandfather, but it has since taken on various meanings in her mind.  She has said, “Later on,on tour, when I’d be on the road, I’d think about my kids when I was singing it, or I might think about my father who passed away.  So, when you’re singing a song about loss and then if you’re going through bereavement, it can take on new meaning and you think about what you’re going through at this particular time with that song.”

3
“Do I Love You”
Paul Anka
1971
Peak:   #53
Simply one of the best love songs ever written.  Great job, Paul Anka et al.   And I thought your recordings of this song were superior to Donna Fargo’s, even if her 1978 version went to #2 on the country chart.  “Do I Love You” contains a lyric that is hopeful of a pleasant end to life on this earth:  “If in death the good Lord is kind, you’ll be the last thing on my mind.”

2
“Still Water (Love)”
The Four Tops
1970
Peak:   #11
The Four Tops had seven Top 10 hits  –  and three others that peaked at #11.  Co-written by the great Smokey Robinson, this beautiful number was one of those three.  Today’s rappers should listen to this song over and over to realize what they could and should be doing.  Short and simple but profound lyrics.  Tranquility, repose, peace, love from the depths of one’s innermost being.  Can music access all that?  You bet!  Close your eyes and take this in.  It’s nourishment for your soul.

1
“Unchain My Heart”
Joe Cocker
1987
Peak:   Did not chart!
Mutual admiration:  Growing up, Englishman Joe Cocker’s idol was Ray Charles.  For his part Charles felt the soulful Cocker was the best white blues singer ever.  Charles reached #9 in 1961 with this song, but Cocker’s heartfelt cover more than 25 years later was better.  In a joint interview in late 1987 Charles said of Cocker, “What has happened is that he has taken some of the things that he’s heard, as he says, over the years, from me, and put himself into it and made it fresh, and I like that.”  This song is a prime example.  As previously stated, I’m partial to the saxophone in rock music.  Cocker ascribed the title of the song to an album, released the single in 1987 and re-released it five years later.  It never charted in this country, and that’s a crime.  C.R.I.M.E. !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

First Love’s Gentle Breeze

FIRST  LOVE’S  GENTLE  BREEZE

Forty years have passed
since that summer of their youth –
The moonlit walks, the silly smiles,
holding hands, stealing kisses,
riding in the back of the old pickup truck.
A time that was purely magical
to the young girl’s heart,
Awoken for the first time
by a hint of love in the air.
Front porch romance
on starry summer nights.
A birthday concert and a cupcake
that meant more to the girl
than he could ever know.
Playing softball 
until it was so dark,
headlights were sometimes necessary
to finish a close game.
The streak had to end,
as did the magic for him.
But the girl knew love for the first time
and held back a small piece of her heart.
Though she watched him through the years
she moved on…
But never forgot those days –
first love’s gentle breeze,
that swept away the past
and made everything ok,
if for just a little while.

/                                       – JT,
/                                         June 25,  2017

“Requiem” Revised

Here’s a “Requiem” that applies to those who have lived a pretty full life.  I made the changes to the first few lines and the penultimate line in recent days.  

The original creation was inspired by former students I knew who died young in a dreadful single-car accident.  The eventual poem appears in both the collections “My Best to You” and “Providence.”

The version below concluded my earthly father’s obituary in both The Daily Record of Wooster and the Ashland Times-Gazette.  He passed away on May 21, 2017 at the age of 90.

 

REQUIEM

Most good things
/ this life had willed
Have been finally
/ now fulfilled…
Yet as we fumble
/ for words to say,
Death never takes
/ it all away.                                                                                                                              

Some plans our God
/ does not reveal;
The faithful trust
/ He must conceal
Love mere man
/ here cannot know…
By grace this day
/ that love will show.

 

My Best to You

My Best to You

I’m 62 years old.  Here are 62 of my most accomplished poems – my best to you.

They are presented in chronological order, so the first ones here probably aren’t as good as the latter.  The parentheses give the date on which the poem was conceived and originally written; an asterisk (*) indicates the poem was revised at a later date – often many years later.

Here’s hoping you enjoy them.  Remember that poetry is meant to be read out loud.  Failing that, several readings will allow you a deeper appreciation of the rhyme and meter, both of which are more prevalent in the more recent creations toward the end of this post.

The shorter poems in the later years were intentionally so written as a requirement for publication.

.              “And before dying I want to share these poems of my soul…
.               My poems are soft green,
.               My poems are also flaming crimson,
.               My poems are like a wounded fawn seeking refuge in the forest.”
.                                                                         – from “Guantanamera” by the Sandpipers (1966)

 Index
All I Desire…………………………………………………12

Bagatelle…………………………………………………..21
Bit Part……………………………………………………..11
The Blessing………………………………………………26
Castles in the Sand………………………………………14
Come What May………………………………………….51
Counsel for a Friend……………………………………..24
Credit the Airwaves………………………………………38
Dark December Night…………………………………….4
Days of Blue……………………………………………….20
Defender of the Flame………………………………….23
Everywhere Around……………………………………..47
Evolution……………………………………………………40
Fateful Transition (Musings on a Pop Classic)……….29
Footbridge…………………………………………………….2
Full Throttle……………………………………………….45
Hit Me………………………………………………………..50
I’d Be Rich………………………………………………….55
Imperative………………………………………………….25
Insecurity…………………………………………………..48
In the Meadow……………………………………………61
The Jogger………………………………………………….28
Long Odds………………………………………………….37
Losers……………………………………………………….39
Love at First Sight…………………………………………52
Love’s Fortune…………………………………………….18
Middle-Class Blues………………………………………10
Misperception…………………………………………….8
Mixer’s Mistake………………………………………….19
My Only Rose………………………………………………26
Night-Rise…………………………………………………..46
No Chance…………………………………………………13
One Wish (40-10 = 20+10)……………………………..31
Out There………………………………………………….57
Pardon Me………………………………………………….58
Passions of Old…………………………………………..60
Patience…………………………………………………….33
Poet’s Drought…………………………………………….62
Prayer for a Special Love………………………………….1
Queens of the Flashing Lights…………………………16
Reprieve………………………………………………….27
Requiem………………………………………………….54
A Rose for Sharon………………………………………..5
Seek to Give……………………………………………….9
See Me Monday…………………………………………..56
A Shoulder to Cry On……………………………………22
Sparks…………………………………………………….49
Teachers………………………………………………….34
Teenage Eyes……………………………………………..15
This Night………………………………………………….35
To Stop Believing………………………………………….17
To the Aged  (Hear! Hear!)…………………………….59
Traces……………………………………………………….30
Ultrapoem………………………………………………….32
The Up Side of Down……………………………………..6
Virtue 1:  Faith……………………………………………..41
Virtue 20:  Love……………………………………………44
Virtue 2:  Prudence………………………………………42
Virtue 17:  Responsibility………………………………43
Was It the Smoke?……………………………………….3
Willows Weep………………………………………………7
You………………………………………………………….53


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1
PRAYER FOR A SPECIAL LOVE

May her heart know of the special love
/   that sends me to my knees today:

Now may the sun shine on her
/   long after it sets on the rest of the world.
May the cold north wind miss her house
/   as it blusters by,
May the thundering storm only tap gently
/   at her window pane.
May the roaring sea be as serene
/   as the calm of a country pond.
May her wildest dream of a thousand miles
/   be only a step away,
May the best of her yesterdays
/   fill all her tomorrows with joy,

And may her heart always know of a special love
/   that brings me to my knees this way.

(July 13, 1975 *)

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2
FOOTBRIDGE

Flowing through the valley of my latest dream,
Our love was the footbridge on a mountain stream.
Though days became cool as shadows grew long,
Our love, like the footbridge, was steadfast and strong.

Even as the days grew dark, our hearts were warm,
Until the autumn wind brought a raging storm.
Rain fell like bullets from the black skies above,
Enraging the once-gentle stream of our love.

We knew that our footbridge might not survive
As we watched the banks swell with the swirling tide.
And when it creaked and cracked and finally gave,
Love went with the footbridge to a watery grave.

(July 4, 1976)

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3
WAS IT THE SMOKE?

Looking back on our love’s flickering flame,
We can’t believe the fire once burned so high;
We can’t believe we sat and watched it die.
Now we’re sniffing the smoke and wondering why.

After the sun had set on our day of love,
Our words merely floated upon the air;
Our hearts tried to speak and we weren’t even there,
We waved goodbye to our dream and didn’t even care.

After the chilling night had set in around us,
“I’m sorry” was simply the wrong thing to say.
Our brilliance had faded to a dull shade of gray,
So we waited for the darkness to take us away.

After the night had passed, it brought the dawn,
And once more the sun shone down upon the land.
And though our love had died we couldn’t understand
Why we longed for the touch of each other’s hand.

Looking back on our love’s flickering flame,
We can’t believe the fire once burned so high.
Now we’re sniffing the smoke and wondering why.
Was it the smoke that made you sit down and cry,
And is the smoke to blame for the tear in my eye?

(September 1-2, 1976)

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 4

DARK DECEMBER NIGHT

Waking up in the middle
/    of a cold and dark December night,
I reach out and turn on a light.
Sitting up in bed,
I could swear I heard her calling my name,
But this isn’t the time for a silly game,
So I guess it must have been
/    the wind whistling outside my window.
But in wiping the sleep from my eyes,
I could see the glow of her golden hair;
I could swear I saw her standing there!
No, it can only be the lateness
/    of the hour playing tricks on me.
Reaching for another cover,
The night seems to be getting a little colder.
Oh, I thought I felt her hand upon my shoulder!
The warmth of her gentle touch is with me now,
But it’s just my imagination once again.
Will these desperate illusions never end?
Will I always hear the sound of her voice?
Will I always feel the touch of her hand?
Will her memory ever let me go free,
Or will she always stay with me,
Even in the middle
/    of a cold and dark December night?
Without answers
I reach out and turn off the light.

(September 9-10, 1976)

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5
A ROSE FOR SHARON

Sharon had seen better days.
To her a rose had always been the symbol of love.
She used to say,
/     “Give me some flowers to put in my hair;
/       Pick me a rose to show that you care.”
But now her best days had come and gone.
By her twenty-first year she was very old;
She called her life,
/     “The start of a story that would not be told.”
Still, Sharon was the sparkle in a young man’s eye:
/     “She outshines the stars that shine in the sky.”
But despite all his prayers he found no way to save her,
Though while she lived,
If it was roses she wanted,
It was roses he gave her.
They used to say,
/     “We don’t really care where life’s river flows,
/       For we have each other and we have the rose.”
They tried to run from their fate,
But soon that look of despair appeared on their faces.
They should have known,
Fate has a way of winning its races.
So she said to him,
/     “Please give me a rose like those times before.”
Through her trembling hand its petals fell to the floor.
For one last time they shared the pain.
She crawled in his arms and they both started to cry
When she said,
/     “Please take this rose and don’t let it die.”
His heart saw the gardens that would never be
When Sharon said,
/     “Please take this rose and keep it for me.”

(May 19-22, 1977)

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6
THE UP SIDE OF DOWN

Like a ghetto child
Trying to make good on the bad side of town,
I’m trying to believe in the up side of down.

When one path is blocked, I’ll try another way;
I’ll find the cloud’s silver lining on a rainy day.
The oak fights the storm and in the process grows strong;
A fire’s warmth feels better when the winter night is long.
Among mountain crags the prettiest flowers often bloom;
I can feel close to God in the solace of my room.
Rough diamonds are cut and polished to form the precious stone;
Nature’s grandeur can seem greater when I’m standing all alone.
I’d never feel comfort if I’d never known the pain;
I’d never see a rainbow if I’d never known the rain.

So like a ghetto child
Who makes a good life on the bad side of town,
I’m finding I believe in the up side of down.

(June 22, 28-30, 1977)

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7
WILLOWS WEEP

As the horizon agrees
/   to be the sun’s pillow,
A solitary man sits
/   beneath a witnessing willow
By a placid lake
/   that reflects my mood of blue
These misty eyes can’t help
/   picturing you
And how our leap of faith
/   fell inches short…
Where it takes ten for love,
/   we counted nine.
Oh, I tried to be yours
/   and you tried to be mine,
But to err by degree
/   was still wrong direction
When the quest for a mate
/   was the pursuit of perfection…
In the deep purple dusk
/   it’s this past I see,
And it seems the willows weep
/   for you and me.

(July 21, 1977 *)

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8
MISPERCEPTION

I picked up a burning match,
But it felt like a rampaging brush fire
Blazing in my hand.
You must have thought me a fool;
Still I thank you for trying to understand.
Though I have no room for regrets,
My mind knows the misperception killed a dream,
And my heart never forgets.
Today most of the smoke has cleared,
And I’ve become just another guy
Who could not begin to fathom your flame.
Still I’m grateful to you for showing me
How playing with fire can be a dangerous game.

(September 1-3, 1977)

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9
SEEK TO GIVE

Asking, “What can that person do for me?
If I am a twig, will there soon be a tree?”
In each new relationship I had to know,
“In how many ways can he help me grow?”

God said, “Poor questions!  That’s no way to live!
You shouldn’t seek to gain, rather seek to give.
So pass out kindness, then see it through,
And in time good things will come back to you.”

Serving others is now the answer for me.
If I am a twig, there will soon be a tree.
For I grow in relationships bright and new
By asking, “What, my friend, can I do for you?”

(March 14, 1978)

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10
MIDDLE-CLASS BLUES

Teach math to high school kids,
Let dismissal bells be your friend.
Mow the lawn and trim the hedges
And watch them grow out again.
Do a little painting on the side,
Join a bowling league on Thursday night.
Grade papers, plan lessons,
Replace a burned out kitchen light.
Slander a kid in the teachers’ lounge,
Scrape money together to pay for a car.
Pretend your students aren’t sick of books
When you know they really are.

(June 10-11, 1978)

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11
BIT PART

Perhaps in fantasy worlds
May the men
/   encounter girls
With such enticing
/   multiple charms –
Ideal dawns will catch me
/   asleep in your arms

For never in this life
Shall I be like
/  the window shopper
Who often looks
/   but seldom buys –
I’ll fan the fire reflected
/   by your smouldering eyes

Yet within my deepening soul
I know passion plays
/   a minor role
In the bigger drama
/   of dreams come true –
It merely skims the surface
/   of my love for you

(June 17, 19-21, 1978 *)

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12
ALL I DESIRE

Some men chase dreams of the world –
To date a movie star, to own a racing car,
Money in the bank, a high social rank.
Now to each his own, I always say.
But I have no interest in the games they play.

Loving nights to spend alone with you –
Those moonlight walks, quiet midnight talks
By a gentle fire…That’s all I desire.
They can have the joy their world brings
For in you I have found the important things.

(August 20, 1978)

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13
NO CHANCE

So again you’ve lost at love –
What a sorry state!
And every clock ticks on,
/   your hour is late.
Always anted the kitty,
Played your hunches heartfelt –
Just to fold the big hands
/   when the cards were dealt!

Yet it’s worse not to try –
What a terrible fate!
To never sit at the table,
/   to place your wagers too late.
For often you’d wonder
What joys might’ve been;
When you don’t play the game,
/   you’ve no chance to win.

(September 11 & 16, 1978 *)

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14
CASTLES IN THE SAND

Pass the tanning lotion down this way –
It’s another bright and sunny summer day!
A bikini-clad dream within my reach,
Tossing a Frisbee on a crowded beach.
Radios and snacks and volleyball,
Our laughter tells us we’ve got it all!
Riding the waves, going hand in hand,
Building a castle in the soft, wet sand…

Alone in December, the very same place –
A cold mist seems to freeze on my face.
Old footprints dissolve as I walk around,
The lonely cry of a gull is the only sound.
Some things are forever, like waves to the shore,
But changes must come, so we dream no more.
The beach is deserted, a desolate land,
And there are no castles in the cold, wet sand.

(November 24-26, 29, 1978)

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15
TEENAGE EYES

Whispered secrets and laughter and heartfelt dreams,
Each decision is vital to her future schemes!
All the who’s and where’s and when’s and why’s,
Looking at the world through teenage eyes.

Without a hassle she wants to run free and wild,
But under a grown-up shell there’s a sensitive child.
For if she flunks a big test or a boyfriend lies,
Warm tears will be falling from teenage eyes.

Yet her youth finds a message in the music she plays:
To live life to the fullest these golden days!
For a girl gets older and though she tries,
She’ll never see again through teenage eyes.

(January 17, 1979)

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16
QUEENS OF THE FLASHING LIGHTS

Mixing her lines of smooth, sweet talk
With a cute little wiggle in a cute little walk,
She knows all the sexy new moves,
And each week this painted lady proves
She’s the passionate queen of the flashing lights –
Disco’s gift to the world of Saturday Nights.

She’s enough of a woman, yet she gives it more –
Her young body moves swiftly across the floor.

And back at the table one can surely bet
On a glass of beer and a cigarette.
Add a low-cut dress and she’s got it made –
For these are the tools of this popular trade.
While the fever burns hot into warm summer nights,
Some girls thrive as queens of the flashing lights.

(May 28, 1979)

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17
TO STOP BELIEVING

On those very rare occasions
When from the clouded, distant past
There comes a romantic notion or a foolish thought,
I fight them off, stubbornly refusing to be caught
In the half-woven webs of yesteryear.
And so time forces on; life has exalted me –
In fact some say I’m a winner, though they do not see
The murky voids that often well up in my solemn soul.
Not do they perceive the flow of retrospective tears
Across the memories, the miles and the years –
All of which will soon lay to rest my sentimental tendency
To believe in the possible survival
Of that which never existed.

(October 14 & 21, 1979)

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18
LOVE’S FORTUNE

Lowly beginnings; perchance –
/     Two good friends.
Sole determinant:  destiny –
/     How stories end.
Passion plays, scheming –
/     On the shelf.
True love’s fortune
/     always tells itself.

(June 4, 1980)

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19
MIXER’S MISTAKE

Though she was stylish, elegant and sophisticated –
And I had often perceived such things to be overrated,
I quickly accepted the challenge with open arms.
But soon her class nonpareil and her boundless charms
Mercifully proved to be more than I could handle.
For I was a backyard cookout; she was a French souffle’.
It was blue jeans and sneakers versus silk and sachet.
We agreed only on the ending – a clean, easy break…
Mixing root beer with champagne was indeed a mistake!

(June 8, 1980)

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20
DAYS OF BLUE

From health of mind and body
/     to summertime days of blue –
Of countless blessings that are mine,
/     I deserve so very few.
For food on every table,
/     for dreams that may come true –
Thanks for being by my side
/     in all I strive to do.
From personal goals for love and work
/     to a life of service for You –
Thanks for placing within my heart
/     those year-round days of blue.

(June 20, 1980)

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21
BAGATELLE

Too long ago for too short a while
You let the face of us become a smile.
Of course we’re just the subject of poems hereafter,
For all smiles pale in the face of laughter.

And even when the laughter rings loudly no more,
You’d  rather subsist on echoes than reach for the door.
Some say there’s no reason to live a mistake;
You say there are rules you must not break.

So give laughter your best; let the past be blurred –
But know the truth lies within this title word.
Look it up, my friend, for it fits so well –
The smile, to you, was a bagatelle.

(July 11, 1980)

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22
A SHOULDER TO CRY ON

What was
Never knew
What could be,
Sometimes what was
Is
What is
To me.
But what was
To you
Is
A bygone,
So what was
Was
A shoulder to cry on
When what is
Wasn’t.

Now what is
Is
To be
You trust,
What is
Laid
What was
In the dust.
Though you
Chose
Your what is
To rely on,
Let what was
Be
A shoulder to cry on
When what is
Isn’t.

(July 13, 1980)

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23
DEFENDER OF THE FLAME     

Intrigue is reflections
/   that other fires lack;
This flame wavers and falters
/   but always comes back,
Providing soft shadows
/   that bounce and prance –
Across time and space
/   they flicker and dance.
My life moves like a breeze
/   that rekindles the fire;
Any threat of extinction
/   seems to lift it higher.
It burns through the storms
/   and glows through the night,
And though now of no value
/   as heat or light,
Its defender knows
/   that no one can name
A great fire not born
/   of a tiny flame.

(August 6, 16-17, 1980 *)

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24
COUNSEL FOR A FRIEND

Bittersweet remembrance, the returning ghost…
How sad that your past can hurt you most
Not when cherished or despised as yesterday’s way,
But when allowed to live as part of today.
Never should what-was put shackles on tomorrow;
A martyr loses all if he drowns in his sorrow.
Handling your past is something you must do –
Start by refusing to let it handle you!

(February 21-22, 1981)

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25
IMPERATIVE

Pursue a wild dream,
/   yours and mine –
Playfully tamper
/   with the hands of time.
Diminish the doubts,
/   delete the fears –
Believe love can add
/   and subtract the years!

When tomorrow’s horizon is hazy,
Remember not all beginnings have ends.
Trust in something that’s crazy;
Believe age is a rule that bends.

Have faith in miracles;
/   it’s never too late.
Challenge convention;
/   join forces with fate.
Turn back the clock
/   or fast-forward the days;
Live boldly our dream
/   in those timeless ways.

(June 20, 1981 *)

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26
MY ONLY ROSE

If God plants the seed,
/    each man reaps what He sows.
In the garden of life
/    true love is a rose…
And I dream of sharing a kiss
/    in the moon’s cool light,
Of being close to your heart
/    through a starry night.
But I’m keeping it secret,
/    though my senses are reeling –
How I hate the frustration
/    of hiding the feeling!
I’d rather shout it out loud
/    till the whole world knows –
In His garden of life
/    you’re my only rose!

(August 8, 1981)

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27
REPRIEVE

O Truth,
Grant me a favor.
Let me be so bold!
Ease your grip,
Lessen your hold,
Permit me to dream.

O God,
Pervade my soul.
Bring me strength enough
To play life’s game
When the game plays rough!
Answer my prayer.

O Death,
Grant me a stay!
But as long as I live,
Will me to take
Less than I give.
Permit me reprieve.

(May 1, 1983)

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28
THE JOGGER

Desperado sees not what’s wrong,
/    what’s right –
One well-thrown stone
/    blacks lone street light.
He’s shadow-lurking to await
/    unsuspecting passerby…

The slum-jogging would-be victim
/    utters words of prayer
For God’s unfortunate low-lives
/    who are dying there,
Oblivious to the encounter that looms
/    around the corner.

Intercession, petition…
aspiring criminal could hear it!
Was he reluctant to challenge
/    some Unknown Spirit,
Or were hibernating morals
/    stirred and awakened?

A credo so hostile, so callous,
/    so poised to attack –
But came that moment of truth,
/    he’d shrunken back
From God’s unwitting witness
/    who jogged more than the miles.

(October 2-4, 1984)

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29
FATEFUL TRANSITION  (MUSINGS ON A POP CLASSIC)

Do you suppose Mr. Simon
/   would understand?
Through dark, weary years
/   I held onto her hand,
Laying me down
/   as her mind-easing
/      bridge of song.
But no dream sporting offspring
/   could shine to my soul;
As evenings-falling-hard
/   exacted their toll,
The undried tears
/   of a silver girl
/      sailed on by…
Now I blame disdain for life
/   minus son or daughter
For causing the bridge
/   to become the troubled water.

(June 9-12, 1987 *)

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30
TRACES

Within stark shadows
/   relentlessly cast
/       by the supreme reality
/           of our situation,
We cherish traces of light
/   somehow sustained
/       in the fleeting reflections
/           of our fantasy.

(June 7, 1989)

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31
ONE WISH  (40-10 + 20+10)

A genie sprang from a bottle,
Offering fame and fortune and fun.
“Three wishes will I for you fulfill.”
But I told him I needed just one:

A decade of age fell from my soul;
I was back in my thirtieth year!
When my ingenue caught the ten,
I said, “Thanks, we’ll take it from here!”

(June 9 & 11, 1989 *)

 

32
ULTRAPOEM

Though Webster tries,
He must realize
That you’re the definition of beauty.
Or if it truly lies
In the beholder’s eyes,
Then the Universe gazes upon you.

(June 16, 1989)

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33
PATIENCE

Most of us dreamers sell out,
But I’ve never been like the rest.
To persevere is to pass
Each faith-shaking test.

Timing is the master
/    of every fate…
While some jump too soon
And others move too late,
I know those who want the best
/    must wait.

Life’s adventures all teach
How patience fosters success.
So I’ve set my sights on a star,
And I’ll never settle for less.

(June 26-27, 1989)

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34
TEACHERS

In recesses of our minds
/   bittersweet successes are stored –
We live a profession known
/   to be its own reward,
And no other aspect of teaching
/   can rightly mean so much
As knowing you make a difference
/   in the lives you touch.

(July 8, 1989)

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35
THIS NIGHT

Special moments won’t listen
/   to rhyme or reason;
The seeds of love may be sown
/   in any season…
So improvise a pillow
/   in yon patch of clover,
Lay your open
/   ere this night be over.
Harvest wonders under stars
/   and an August moon…
Yes, damn the dawn’s plan
/   to intrude so soon!
Supersede in one eve
/   the seeds planted before,
And share the secrets meant
/   to be secrets no more!

(July 9-10, 1989)

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36
THE BLESSING

He could mark his tally
/   before the game had begun;
He knew the score
/   before the race was run.
So he saw each date
/   even as he dressed –
With no guesswork to do,
/   our boy’d been blessed!

But where was rapture,
/   and where was bliss?
Where was the thrill
/   in love’s first kiss?
Where were sweaty palms
/   on the steering wheel?
Where was the dream
/   that fights to be real?

One tips off romance
/   with “Be still, my heart.”
He couldn’t finish
/   what he didn’t start.
So he never reached
/   “For better, for worse.”
Just what is a blessing,
/   and what is a curse?

(July 24-27, 1989)

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37
LONG ODDS

For her priceless affections
/   countless suitors will vie.
Faced with lottery odds,
/   a slim chance have I.
My heart quiets my head –
/   I’m compelled to try.

Too often I’m haunted
/   by what could have been,
So despite long odds
/   this gambler wants in!
A grand prize is at stake –
/   someone’s destined to win.

That’s the way a game’s played
/   in the quest for a mate,
So my chances no more
/   shall these words debate.
And if “someone” ‘s another
/   I’ll not rail at fate.

(July 31 & August 1-2, 1989)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

38
CREDIT THE AIRWAVES

Inspiration was the tuning
/   of a radio dial.
The Seventies’ records reared
/   my writing style.
In that maze of lyrics
/   the melodies were lost –
Oh, I could’ve been studying
/   Tennyson of Frost,
But I preferred pop lessons
/   from a vinyl stack,
So I had tutors like Lennon
/   and Fleetwood Mac.

(August 10-11, 1989)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

39
LOSERS

Keenly aware
Of our sad misplays
And all the chances blown…

Richly blessed
With much to offer –
Still we stand alone.

Seemingly damned
By this sorry state,
We stubbornly muddle through,

Meekly hoping
That quirks of fate
Reward the faithful few.

(August 14, 1989)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

40
EVOLUTION

O Ultimate Voice…
Ever tune my receiver
/   to heed what you say;
Work the pliable me
/   like a fine lump of clay.
O Quintessential Potter…
Might I always acquiesce
/   to your gracious demands;
May you constantly mold me
/   in your masterful hands.

(May 26-27, 1990)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

41
VIRTUE 1:  FAITH

A good man’s
/    Good Book
Collects no dust
/    upon its shelf –
There’s this need to believe
/    in something
That’s much bigger
/    than oneself.

It’s blazing trails
/    beyond the bend,
Once-fallow furrows
/    growing green…
Paul in Hebrews
/    called it
The evidence
/    of things unseen.

It’s a link
/    to peace eternal,
To what’s right
/    our trust is wired…
Brotherhood
/    and a God who’s good –
No support
/    from reason required.

(June 24-25, 1994)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

42
VIRTUE 2:  PRUDENCE

Know when to pick a side
/   and when to straddle the fence.
Show your practical wisdom
/   and use your common sense.
Weigh the valid views
/   of all the diverse factions.
Always prejudge the likely
/   results of your actions.

Know when to become a friend
/   and when to remain a stranger.
Be circumspect where there’s risk,
/   on the alert where there’s danger.
Distinguish life’s true loves
/   from its infatuations.
Choose a workable plan
/   in pressure situations.

Know when to stand up strong
/   and when to take a seat.
May your conduct be self-disciplined,
/   may your decisions be discreet.
Tossing caution to the wind?
/   Your soul would think it treason!
So carefully manage your affairs
/   and govern yourself through reason.

(June 27-28, 1994)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

43
VIRTUE 17:  RESPONSIBILITY

Those teens who so long
/   to be declared
/        autonomous –
Do they know
/   ‘mature’ and ‘responsible’
/        are practically synonymous?
No human beings
/   can be considered
/        fully grown
Till they earn chances
/   to make choices
/        on their own.
All young people
/   give adulthood
/        its first real fling
When loved ones
/   can trust them
/        to do the right thing.

(August 16, 1994)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

44
VIRTUE 20:  LOVE

An ideal acquired
/   through living,
Born more of will
/   than of whim…
It’s accepting God’s grace
/   toward us
While sharing
/   our reverence
/       for Him.

But more it’s a
/   genuine aura,
A gentle
/   and generous kind…
By what is given
/   of oneself
The capacity
/   for love
/       is defined.

Christ would say
/   it’s the ultimate virtue;
This writer has saved it
/   for last…
An eternal
/   and worthy legacy
When our days
/   on this planet
/       have passed.

(August 23-24, 1994)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

45
FULL THROTTLE

The alluring purr of the motor…
Still a foot’s firm on the brake.
We’ve been coping quite well
/   with some cosmic mistake.

But, oh, those utopian roads
Where what-if’s come to pass –
We’d kick open the throttle
/   on a full tank of gas!

(March 15, 1997)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V ^V^V^V^V

46
NIGHT-RISE

As a subtle curtain descends
/    upon another day,
A weary sun finds a pillow
/    on some distant hill…
A warm enchantment settles in
/    with the evening chill.
As starry beacons preside
/    in abundant glory,
As the bustling city defers
/    and slows its pace…
A once-veiled night steps out
/    and shows its face.

(April 25, 1998)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

47
EVERYWHERE AROUND

What nuances might explain
/   where you are today?
How can someone who’s still here
/   be so far away?
Why does my future unfold
/   when to the past I’m bound?
How can someone who’s long gone
/   be everywhere around?

(August 5-6, 1998)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

48
INSECURITY

When you make me feel needed,
I can sleep throughout the night.
If you’d just say you love me,
I would surely be all right.
If I knew I’d won your favor
With my sad-romantic ways,
I could look back in reminiscence
Or ahead to better days.
Should I endure these tough times
To find something to enjoy…
There might someday be a man
Where there’s now a little boy.

(February 13-14, 1999)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

49
SPARKS

Can’t rightly expect it
/   to burn the same –
I must settle for
/   a lingering ember.
My challenge will be
/   to rekindle the flame
In the ashes
/   of fires remembered.

(May 31, 1999)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

 

50
HIT ME

Life’s a blackjack game,
And the stakes are plenty.
She’s redoubling her bets –
And she won’t stand on twenty!
I step away from the table;
There’s to be no saving face…
As “love bears all things,”
May her card be an ace!

(September 12-13, 1998)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

51
COME WHAT MAY

Thank You for this morning
And its opportunity to pray,
Forgive the many sins
I commit along the way.
Be present in my life
Through this and every day,
Prepare me for my future –
Come what may.

(September 19, 1999)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

52
LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT

What I believe about romance
/  may need some correction…
Spotted her from my seat
/  in the nosebleed section,
Sneaked down to steal a glance
/  in her direction,
Used a faithful friend
/  as line-of-sight protection…
I should ditch this plan
/  for escaping detection;
My future appears
/  in a vision of perfection!

(October 24-25 & 31, 1999)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

53
YOU

No topic has been so sublime…
Yes, I write of you often,
But not this time!
As another day dawns
To ask what’s in store,
I scratch the same old itch;
I’ve been here before.
Yet to be stuck in this rut,
To have sought something new…
Is to hope these lines
Find their way back to you!

(March 5 & 11, 2000)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

54
REQUIEM                               

Most good things
/   this life had willed
Have sadly gone
/   unfulfilled…
But as we fumble for
/   the words to say,
Death never takes
/  it all away.
Some plans our God
/   does not reveal;
The faithful trust
/   He must conceal
Love mere man
/   here cannot know…
By grace one day
/   that love will show.

(September 22-25, 2001)
(This poem was an adaptation of “Sad December” lyrics.)                                                                                                               

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

55
I’D BE RICH

You can call my bluff –
Don’t let me walk alone.
Who could have enough
To make it on his own?
Nothing pays love’s price.
(A point the rich concede!)
If you’d roll love’s dice,
We’d win just what we need.

Golden dreams refined –
We’d own the lion’s share.
How is wealth defined?
How could it all compare?
Heaven shows its face
Each time a knot is tied.
Who could earn that grace?
It’s you here by my side!

(2001-2002)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

56
SEE ME MONDAY

Hurry up, weekend –
/  You have to get here soon.
I cannot settle
/  for Friday noon.
Sick and tired
/  of workaday stuff,
I’m watching the clock –
/  It ain’t fast enough!
Come quitting time,
/  I won’t be found.
They’ll look for my car;
/  I’m not around.
Good riddance, office –
/  I’m homeward bound!

(July 19-20, 2002)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

57
OUT THERE

We’ve probably passed
/   on a busy street;
I know you’re out there,
/   but where do we meet?
Do I belly up
/   to a fancy bar,
Spend money and time
/   where the women are?
Do you show your rhythm
/   on a lighted floor,
Get stuck at some party
/   with a hopeless bore?
The whole singles scene
/   is so deflating,
Almost desperate enough
/   for computer dating!
The phone never rings;
/   I’m tired of waiting…
If I knew where to look,
/   you’d be swept off your feet;
I know you’re out there,
/   but how do we meet?

(August 5, 2002)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

58
PARDON ME

My conscience is far from clear…
Have I locked up my soul in jail?
Though standing trial remains my fear,
His grace will post my bail.
If there are no sins He can’t forgive,
Will mercy over justice prevail?
It’s a godly life I seek to live…
Why do I so frequently fail?

(August 14-15, 2002)                

^V^V ^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

59
TO THE AGED  (HEAR!  HEAR!)

The future never was
/   ours to see;
Propose no toast
/   to what will be.
Some are content
/   to have come so far;
Underachievers drink
/   to what they are.
Only with lenses thick
/   and hair gone thin
Dare we raise a glass
/   to what we’ve been.

(August 12-13, 2003)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V ^V^V

60
PASSIONS OF OLD

Only I could want
/   what we could be;
Tomorrow’s a vision
/   we shall not see.
Oh, we sometimes gaze
/   upon our star,
But valentines and such
/   just go so far
Toward dulling the truth
/  of what we are.
Yet be they crystal clear
/   or blessed blur,
Those passions of old
/   do here now stir
In brilliant remembrance
/   of what we were!

(February 1, 2004)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V ^V^V^V^V

61
IN THE MEADOW

I admire the grace of a deer
/   as he sees me and flees.
Give me the steady drone
/   of those busy bees.
(Though tell them to keep
/   their distance, please!)
I love the way a wind will tease
/   the silver leaves
In nearby stand of mighty trees;
I envy the eagle who soars
/   on that same summer breeze.

(May 9, 2004)

^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V^V

62
POET’S DROUGHT

Lyrical topics galore
/  I’ve yet to find…
No flashy couplets
/  have sprung to mind.
Given one small idea,
/  I’d get carried away!
Still here I sit
/  in utter dismay,
Refusing to believe
/  I have nothing to say.
So I pick up a pen
/  lest my plight become worse.
Call it a dry spell, a slump,
/  or maybe a curse…
It’s been far too long
/  since I’ve written a verse.

(June 15-16, 2005)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Index (of what follows below)

I   N   D   E   X    (  O F    W H A T    F O L L O W S    B E L O W  )

Abnegation………………………………………….19
All I Desire………………………………………….153
Allies of the Now………………………………….15
Analogy Graces My Getaway…………………….53
Anjanette………………………………………….29
Angelic Embrace………………………………….105
Bagatelle………………………………………….131
Beauty Unseen……………………………………120
Bit Part…………………………………………….151
The Blessing………………………………………..138
Canonized!  …………………………………………28
Capitulation Poem……………………………….145
Capricious Kiss…………………………………….150
Captive of Her Smile…………………………….106
Castles in the Sand………………………………125
Cloudy……………………………………………….43
Cold Goodbyes…………………………………….142
Color Love Blue……………………………………104
Come What May…………………………………….89
Counsel for a Friend……………………………….65
Credit the Airwaves………………………………..67
Dark December Night……………………………..52
Days of Blue………………………………………..86
Defender of the Flame…………………………… 38
A Desperate Love………………………………….49
Dispassion…………………………………………58
Dream Breaker……………………………………..96
The Dreamer’s Guide……………………………….78
Everywhere Around…………………………………45
Evolution……………………………………………..88
Fateful Transition (Musings on a Pop Classic)…..128
First Anniversary……………………………………162
Flagged………………………………………………..14
Flowers and Weeds………………………………..113
Footbridge…………………………………………..56
For Two at One Time………………………………156
For Want of a Summer Day………………………124

Friend………………………………………………..74
Friendship Cliche’ …………………………………70
Full Throttle………………………………………..163
Glory on a Page…………………………………..122
Glory to the King…………………………………..91
Goodbye Angel……………………………………137
Gratitude……………………………………………..87
He Is the Lord……………………………………….81
His First-Born Son………………………………..154
Hit Me……………………………………………..136
Hitting the Wall…………………………………..77
Hold It, My Friend!  ……………………………..140
How Dark Is the Night……………………………55
Hyperbole…………………………………………30
I’d Be Rich………………………………………..164
I’d Be Rich (Reprise)…………………………….165
If It’s Love…………………………,,…………….117
I’ll Own the Store…………………………………. 80
Imperative………………………………………….102
Imprints……………………………………………..146
Insecurity……………………………………………31
In the Warmth of a Tear………………………….132
In the Meadow…………………………………….119
The Jogger…………………………………………..4
The Joy I Feel……………………………………..161
Just a Dreamer…………………………………….144
Knockout……………………………………………32
Let God Be the Doctor…………………………….83
Let My Heart………………………………………111
Life’s Bedroom Cold and Dark…………………….12
Limited Apology……………………………………..40
Long Odds…………………………………………..26
Looking at Love Tonight…………………………….47
Losers………………………………………………134
Love at First Sight……………………………………37
Love in a Box………………………………………….34
Love’s Fortune………………………………………107
Marriage:  Prayer for a Friend…………………….159
Mental Highway……………………………………….9
Middle-Class Blues………………………………….72
A Million to One……………………………………130
Misconception………………………………………109
Misperception………………………………………..50
Mixer’s Mistake…………………………………….. 54
A Mother First………………………………………..33
Much More…………………………………………….46
A Mutual Feeling……………………………………..148
My Only Rose…………………………………………94
My Ultimate………………………………………….101
Never With Me………………………………………149
Night-Rise……………………………………………..123
No Chance……………………………………………..20
No Christmas Song……………………………………60
No True Escape……………………………………….21
O Mighty Fire…………………………………………..3
One Wish (40-10 = 20+10)……………………………27
Out There………………………………………………41
p…………………………………………………………10
Pardon Me……………………………………………..92
Passion and Pride…………………………………….108
Passions of Old……………………………………….61
Patience………………………………………………..22
Perfect Love……………………………………………35
Phantom in Disguise (What Used to Be)……………121
Picture a Candle……………………………………….114
Poet’s Drought…………………………………………..23
Practical Pre$ent$………………………………………69
Prayer…………………………………………………… 82
Prayer for a Special Love…………………………….160
A Pretty Face……………………………………………99
Prisoner………………………………………………….147
Providence………………………………………………93
Queens of the Flashing Lights………………………..72
Red Fiero…………………………………………………..75
Reprieve………………………………………………….18

Requiem………………………………………………….90
The Return of Night……………………………………115
A Rose for Sharon………………………………………129
Sad December……………………………………………..63
Scrimmage………………………………………………135
Seek to Give………………………………………………85
See Me Monday…………………………………………76
Shipwreck……………………………………………….126
A Shoulder to Cry On………………………………….133
Springtime Dream………………………………………112
Songwriter………………………………………………..64
Sparks…………………………………………………….97
Stargazing………………………………………………118
Starship Venus……………………………………………103
Storybook Life………………………………………………16
Stoke the Fire……………………………………………….24
Subtle Miracles………………………………………………7
Super Star……………………………………………………42
Sweeter to Sing…………………………………………….84
Sweet Respite………………………………………………98
Take a Chance……………………………………………..36
Teachers…………………………………………………..68
Teenage Eyes………………………………………………2
Telephone…………………………………………………62
Terminal Rhyme……………………………………………51
These Two……………………………………………………71
This Night……………………………………………………39
Though I……………………………………………………….6
Though the Years Be a Tunnel………………………….141
Time and Me………………………………………………143
Time May Authenticate My Dreams………………….158
Tooth Decay…………………………………………………95
Too Much for Me………………………………………….79
To Stop Believing…………………………………………139
To the Aged (Hear! Hear!)………………………………66
To Wait for Her…………………………………………….25
Traces…………………………………………………………13
Trivial Romance……………………………………………59
Turning Back………………………………………………..57
Two…………………………………………………………….17
Ultrapoem…………………………………………………100
The Up Side of Down………………………………….116
Valentine Yesterday……………………………………155
Valerie’s Light……………………………………………..44
Venus and Verse…………………………………………..1
Virtue 7:  Charity……………………………………….173
Virtue 11:  Chastity…………………………………….177
Virtue 12:  Chivalry……………………………………..178
Virtue 18:  Citizenship………………………………….184
Virtue 9:  Compassion…………………………………175
Virtue 1:  Faith………………………………………….167
Virtue 10:  Forgiveness………………………………..176
Virtue 4:  Fortitude……………………………………..170
Virtue 14:  Honesty……………………………………..180
Virtue 6:  Hope……………………………………………172
Virtue 8:  Humility……………………………………….174
Virtue 3:  Justice…………………………………………..169
Virtue 20:  Love……………………………………………186
Virtue 16:  Loyalty…………………………………………182
Virtue 15:  Patience……………………………………….181
Virtue 2:  Prudence……………………………………….168
Virtue 13:  Respect………………………………………..179
Virtue 17:  Responsibility……………………………….183
Virtue 19:  Serenity………………………………………..185
Virtue 5:  Temperance……………………………………171
Was He Wrong?  …………………………………………..157
Was It the Smoke?   ……………………………………….48
What Pen Is Lifted?  ……………………………………….110
Willows Weep…………………………………………….127
With Kid Gloves…………………………………………….5
You………………………………………………………….166
Your Crazy Love……………………………………………152

Ten (10) Internet Collections

Ten (10) Internet Collections, by Rich Schulz…See posts that follow.
The title of each collection is loosely descriptive of its theme.

The Years Go By                                24 poems           1-24
Love in a Box                                     17                      25-41
Dark December Night                      20                      42-61
Friends                                               19                      62-80
Providence                                         15      159 (Re-posted here), 81-88, 167 (Re-posted here), 89-93
Love’s Fortune                                   16                    94-109
For Want of a Summer Day              16                  110-125
Dreams Die in the Warmth of a Tear    24             126-149
My Love for You                                 17                  150-166
The Virtue Series                               20                   167-186

Total                                                  186 poems         1-186   

The Years Go By

THE YEARS GO BY     
THE YEARS GO BY
THE YEARS GO BY
.
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1      VENUS AND VERSE

Can flying mile markers
/   count couplets?
Sure, if one shifts his mind
/   to the proper mode,
Odes have been written
/   on the road.

Can conception come
/   in the wee hours?
Well, see them dancing
/   in dimly-lit den…
That mistress paper,
/   alone with her pen!

Do sweet lines glide
/   off swings or slides?
New lyrics love a late stroll
/   through the park,
Where a final touch whispers
/   itself to the dark.

Can his-and-her hearts
/   mix with a Muse?
Embraceable dreams drift in
/   when spirits merge,
Fating Venus and verse
/   to ever converge!
.
.
.
.
.
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.
.
2      TEENAGE EYES                                                                                         *****

Whispered secrets and laughter and heartfelt dreams,
Each decision is vital to her future schemes!
All the who’s and where’s and when’s and why’s,
Looking at the world through teenage eyes.

Without a hassle she wants to run free and wild,
But under a grown-up shell there’s a sensitive child.
For if she flunks a big test of a boyfriend lies,
Warm tears will be falling from teenage eyes.

Yet her youth finds a message in the music she plays:
To live life to the fullest these golden days!
For a girl gets older and though she tries,
She’ll never see again through teenage eyes.
.
.
.
.
.
.
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.

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3     O MIGHTY FIRE

O Mighty Fire!
How your flames light my mind,
How your heat warms my soul.
O Mighty Fire!
Your sparks are a glimmer of hope in the hollow darkness,
And your smoke makes me a little high.
O Mighty Fire!
Today you are strong; you burn bright.
But will you still be with me tomorrow?
O Mighty fire!
Soon your flames will dwindle and you’ll begin to die,
And then only ashes will remain.
Only ashes – O mighty fire!

(May 25-26, 1974)
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4     THE JOGGER                                                                                              *****

Desperado sees not what’s wrong,
/   what’s right –
One well-thrown stone
/   blacks lone street light.
He’s shadow-lurking to await
/   unsuspecting passerby…

The slum-jogging would-be victim
/   utters words of prayer
For God’s unfortunate low-lives
/   who are dying there,
Oblivious to the encounter that looms
/   around the corner.

Intercession, petition…
/   aspiring criminal could hear it!
Was he reluctant to challenge
/   some Unknown Spirit,
Or were hibernating morals
/   stirred and awakened?

A credo so hostile, so callous,
/   so poised to attack  –
But came that moment of truth,
/   he’d shrunken back
From God’s unwitting witness
/   who jogged more than the miles.
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5     WITH KID GLOVES

Treat me roughly?
Well, don’t you dare!
‘Tis no trite warning –
Let the user beware!
You’ve seen how I protest –
Now handle with care!
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6      THOUGH I

Though I begin,
The first step
Is not the longest.
If I endure,
It’s not because
I’m the strongest.
Though I seek,
My dreams can run
While I must walk.
Though I speak,
It’s never me
Who seems to talk.

Though I touch,
My feelings lack
True sensation.
When I write,
My words are
Without inspiration.
Though I joke,
What laughter there is
Quickly subsides.
Though I think,
Life’s an issue
Someone else decides.

Though I respond,
I answer questions
No people ask.
Should I try,
My effort seems
Foreign to the task.
Though I pray,
There remains a void
Within my heart.
Though I finish,
I stand too close
To the start.

 

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7     SUBTLE MIRACLES

Life deals a hand
/   that must be played –
A young child learns
/   how to be afraid.
Fear’s often a trust
/   that’s been betrayed.

So a frightened child
/   advances the years
While we all hope 
/   those falling tears
Can work again 
/   their subtle miracle.

The last crayon becomes
/   the first eye shadow,
Then Barbie and Ken
/   learn how to drive!
Adolescence ends innocence,
/   a few memories survive.

We find through the years
/   that those childhood fears
Have somehow been allayed.
Alas, life deals from a deck
/   of trusts betrayed –
Here comes another hand
/   that must be played!

So a frightened teen
/   advances the years
While we all hope
/   those falling tears…
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8      PHANTASM

Typical schoolgirl crush –
/  Picnic in the park?
/  Day at the beach?
No, empty fantasy:
Object of desire
/  out of reach.

The years…

Enter high-flying decade –
/  With suitors to hold,
/  With ambitions to chase.
Fulfillment found:
The key is keeping
/  her twenties pace.

               …go by.

Then atypic reappearance –
/  Hello, object of desire,
/  Hello, dreams of youth!
Her fantasy lives:
De’ja’ vu loves
/  a latent truth!
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9     MENTAL HIGHWAY

Get me back on a road –
/   secondary or main.
How I wish this idea
/   would wax or wane!
Idle moments like these
/  often drive me insane
‘Cause neutral is agony
/  for my active brain.
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10      p

aprils past
/  are so many misty paths
/     that cross then meander off
/         into so many proverbial settings
yet one path would i tread again
/  for showers of time never cloud
/     The remembrance
/         of sunshine
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11     BAD MOVE

Some strategic board position,
/  once timely, had gradually gone,
So the master’s intent was clear:
/  We must sacrifice that pawn

Whose loyalty gained no favor,
/  whose service we underrate.
Now making the move with vision
/  of another grand checkmate!

Oh, may their knights be ready,
/  and may a castle guard their king…
It’s time to brace for the onslaught
/  that one bad move can bring.
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12      LIFE’S BEDROOM COLD AND DARK

So you crawl into bed
And pull the covers over your head.
Then you listen as the wind
/     drives the rain against your window
And howls through the empty corridors of your soul.

You feel the night’s cold air,
But inside you really don’t care
‘Cause the coldness of the night                                                                                                                    /    can’t match the coldness of your heart
Or the frozen tombs in your mind.

You sit and stare at an ugly wall
Or stumble through an unlit hall.
But you don’t feel the hurt of falling
/     ’cause there’s another pain in your life,
A life of darkness like the darkest night.

(November 21, 1974)
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13      TRACES                                                                                                  *****

Within stark shadows
/  relentlessly cast
/     by the supreme reality
/        of our situation,
We cherish traces of light
/   somehow sustained
/      in the fleeting reflections
/         of our fantasy.
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14      FLAGGED

Let me put pen to paper
/   with utmost precision…
Ma’am, I understand and respect
/   your considered decision.
But I’m drawn to your innocence;
/   for that I’ll not be ashamed –
There’s no wild feeling in me
/   that needs to be tamed!
I’m no smooth opportunist
/  out for all he can get –
How ironic it’s my bankbook
/  that makes me a threat!
Why must the fame and success
/   of fine people like me
Raise red flags in your vision
/   of what the future could be?
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15     ALLIES OF THE NOW

Battle stations!  It’s the only way!
/   Get set, all you forces of today –
/       To fight off an army of memories.
/             It’s war!  Crush the sorrow!
/             Be ready, promise of tomorrow –
/       To hold back the broken dreams.
/   Surrender, my enemy!  Death to you, my past!
My Allies of the Now have set me free at last.
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16      STORYBOOK LIFE

You can tap out life’s rhythms
And put your tune to its rhymes –
You’re already living
/   in storybook times…
So don’t tie yourselves down 
By turning back to square one;
Read on and rejoice
/   in new chapters begun!
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17      TWO

Though you’re moving with ease
/   through the natural progression,
The conception in your head’s
/   a surefire regression!
As you deftly maneuver
/   through life’s little turns,
It’s a near perfect course
/   free of major concerns.
So why rock this boat
/   and churn the water to rough?
Why risk all that’s so good
/   when two souls are enough?
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18      REPRIEVE                                                                                *****

 

O Truth,
Grant me a favor.
Let me be so bold!
Ease your grip, 
Lessen your hold,
Permit me to dream.

O God,
Pervade my soul.
Bring me strength enough
To play life’s game
When the game plays rough!
Answer my prayer.

O Death,
Grant me a stay!
But as long as I live,
Will me to take 
Less than I give.
Permit me reprieve.
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19      ABNEGATION

With Wild West in the barroom
/   it’s best to lay low;
If a temptress wants to dance,
/   one can just say no.
Oftentimes a man’s virtue
/   is conceived in vice
As his character is steeled
/   in his sacrifice.
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20     NO CHANCE                                                                                             *****

So again you’ve lost at love –
What a sorry state!
And every clock ticks on;
/    your hour is late.
Always anted the kitty,
Played your hunches heartfelt –
Just to fold the big hands
/    when the cards were dealt!

Yet it’s worse not to try –
What a terrible fate!
To never sit at the table, 
/    to place your wagers too late.
For often you’d wonder
What joys might have been;
When you don’t play the game,
/    you’ve no chance to win.
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21      NO TRUE ESCAPE

Disappointments haunt me;
Into every waking moment they creep.
To achieve reprieve I sleep:
From consciousness failures fade
As I toss life’s onus aside;
Dreamland becomes a place to hide.

Yet even my nights are plagued
By the specter of my daily hell:
I authorize the sounding of a little bell,
So there is no true escape…
An alarm intrudes on dream mentality;
I awake to face the cold reality.
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22       PATIENCE                                                                                                 *****

Most of us dreamers sell out,
But I’ve never been like the rest.
To persevere is to pass 
Each faith-shaking test.

Timing is the master
/     of every fate…
While some jump too soon
And others move too late,
I know those who want the best
/     must wait.

Life’s adventures all teach
How patience fosters success.
So I’ve set my sights on a star,
And I’ll never settle for less.
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23    POET’S DROUGHT                                                                                      *****

Lyrical topics galore
/   I’ve yet to find…
No flashy couplets
/   have sprung to mind.
Given one small idea,
/   I’d get carried away!
Still here I sit
/   in utter dismay,
Refusing to believe
/   I have nothing to say.
So I pick up a pen
/   lest my plight become worse.
Call it a dry spell, a slump
/   or maybe a curse…
It’s been far too long
/   since I’ve written a verse.
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24     STOKE THE FIRE

That vast potential
/  may go to waste.
Big dreams don’t lead;
/  they must be chased.
The challenge makes
/  one feel alive,
But a failure sadly
/  lacks the drive…
Since motivation
/  is all he requires,
Maybe this poem
/  will stir those fires!